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Oct
22
comment A word to make something bad sound good
"Euphemism" doesn't really fit with what OP is looking for, although one of its derivatives does: Euphemize
Nov
8
comment Why is “pineapple” in English but “ananas” in all other languages?
@CleverMasha Just a sentence that uses the word abacaxi?
Nov
7
comment Why is “pineapple” in English but “ananas” in all other languages?
Fun fact: In Brazilian portuguese, it's not called an ananas, but rather "abacaxi".
Jun
28
awarded  Critic
Jun
22
comment Are there any english letters that don't appear twice in a row in the same word?
@WallaceBrown Huh? Does that mean "ray" isn't a real word either because it's often used as a name? I don't understand that logic at all.
Jun
22
comment Is this headline as redundant as it seems?
It's definitely acceptable. It's very possible to find someone who is not currently hiding. I feel like it clarifies by stating that the driver was still in the act of hiding when he was found.
Jun
22
awarded  Commentator
Jun
22
comment Onomatopoeia Across Languages
@Charles how onomatopoetic of you
Jun
22
comment Are there any english letters that don't appear twice in a row in the same word?
@Henry Well then, let me go ahead and XXX my answer.
Jun
21
comment Are there any english letters that don't appear twice in a row in the same word?
W = glowworm Y = sayyid
Jun
21
answered Are there any english letters that don't appear twice in a row in the same word?
Jun
21
comment Position of prepositions in questions and clauses
If this is the case, I must be the odd man out. I find myself using "whom" quite often in regular conversation.
Jun
19
answered “Enclosure” vs. “attachment”
Jun
19
comment “Enclosure” vs. “attachment”
It's probably better to just keep it simple then. If you're handing in the actual code, refer to it as something like "see attached source" or "see attached source code". If it's an actual executable/binary or something like that, "see attached program/software". Keeping it simple will most likely be easiest for your readers.
Jun
19
comment “Enclosure” vs. “attachment”
There may be a term for it, but I have never seen one used nor had need to use one.
Jun
19
comment “Enclosure” vs. “attachment”
As a software developer, I have never heard the term, "enclosure" used in any manner relating to software or bundling of software with documentation. I'd just refer to it as the actual software or the documentation.
Jun
18
comment On/in its semantics?
Unrelated to your particular question, but the given sentence should also begin The returned values seem....
Jun
18
comment Parenthetical commas and foreign English
Just as a side note, this is called an appositive, or an apposition
Jun
14
awarded  Teacher
Jun
14
awarded  Supporter