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seen Apr 14 at 16:23

.Net developer

Language enthusiast


May
2
comment What is the origin of the counting prefixes: uni-, bi-/di-, tri-, quad-, etc.?
@Josh thanks. Added in the common ones.
Apr
29
comment Is there a single word for a “unit of time”?
I'm looking more for a most appropriate variable name. "TimeUnit" would work, but I was wondering if there might be a better term. Unfortunately leaving a variable unnamed does not quite meet the strictest coding requirements.
Apr
29
comment Is there a single word for a “unit of time”?
But duration could just as easily (or would better) refer to both the integer and the time unit ("5 hours", "10 days", etc.)
Apr
25
comment What are the 'distances' among the major English dialects?
Random note: A friend of mine and I were visiting Scotland and met a guy who grew up in Edinburg but whose parents were British. He insisted he had never spent any time around Americans but had a dialect that was nearly identical to ours (a fairly neutral AmE), save a word that would float in every 2 to 3 minutes that sounded completely different. We concluded that this was evidence that (if such a hypothesis can be made) the American dialect is an exact mix of the English and Scottish.
Apr
23
comment “excursion over city” vs “excursion around city”
You would likely want to add an article saying "to/around/above a or the city".
Apr
22
comment What would be a suitable name for the game panel in tetris?
I'm partial to "well"
Apr
22
comment Did English ever have a “you” plural?
In Spanish, vosotros (or os for direct or indirect objects) is the 2nd person plural. Vos is still used in Argentina instead of , and used to be a more formal form of .
Apr
20
comment “Did it go down your *muffler*?”
...and a car's tailpipe is connected to the muffler.
Apr
19
comment Meaning of a sentence using the perfect continuous tense
The most important thing to note is that in both cases, it is implied that the throwing of paper in the past has some impact on the present (ie: they are still rowdy or are still throwing papers, or there is paper all over the classroom, etc.)
Apr
18
comment Is there a word for “one who salvages”?
+1 for Jawas (filler)
Apr
18
comment Where is “pejorative” pronounced “ ˈpejəˌrātiv”?
Now that's helpful! If I don't see anything better over the next few days, the bounty is yours.
Apr
18
comment Is “Can I have a cup of coffee?” polite?
touché =) (filler)
Apr
18
comment Subjunctive mood, progressive and perfect progressive tense
The second works fine. I'm afraid your first and third sentences don't even make enough sense to correct.
Apr
18
comment Is “Can I have a cup of coffee?” polite?
I strongly agree. Mostly because, after having quite a few coffees in England, I would question whether or not he has the capability to make coffee. Their tea, however, far surpasses any American swill and is, I believe, without equal.
Apr
18
comment Where is “pejorative” pronounced “ ˈpejəˌrātiv”?
@FumbleFingers Exactly. Thank you for clarifying my ramblings.
Apr
18
comment Where is “pejorative” pronounced “ ˈpejəˌrātiv”?
Does France have a native English-speaking population? I would expect dictionaries to account for primary dialects, not foreign accents (or else there would be 100 pronunciations for each word).
Apr
18
comment “Best Before” says “11 MA 23”; is it May or March?
That they should use MAR or MAY. And if that one character is so very important, then MR or MY if not the number 03 or 05. MA is much too ambiguous to be of use to the consumer.
Apr
17
comment Is 'couple' ever used in the sense of 'some'?
@Bill K I was not suggesting my friend is right (see my answer above) but rather pointing out something I found humorous.
Apr
17
comment Where is “pejorative” pronounced “ ˈpejəˌrātiv”?
@Cerberus while I agree that drawling out syllables unnecessarily is quite indicative of the Southeastern US, I'm from Georgia and have never heard it pronounced like that (granted, the majority of people who might pronounce it that way would likely not know its meaning).
Apr
17
comment Is 'couple' ever used in the sense of 'some'?
What was interesting to me was when a friend recently insisted that she uses a few to mean two and a couple to mean three or more.