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seen Jul 21 at 19:34

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Language enthusiast


May
19
comment Capitalization of “Internet”
+1 - internet can also be used (without capitalization) to describe something (ie. an internet-ready computer)
May
18
comment Another “ would” usage to maintain the same tense in the sentence
Your question as it stands is off topic. Is there a particular part of the quote with which you are struggling? What do you think might be wrong?
May
17
comment What are some slang words for “police” in countries besides the US?
Bounty to @MikeVaughan for his extensive research
May
13
comment Replacing the periods/dots with spaces in abbreviations
Whether or not it's valid, it's foreign enough that I (an American who speaks only English and Spanish) had to pause to look back and figure out what was going on. It took about 5 to 6 times of glancing at them before I no longer slowed down upon reaching the acronyms.
May
12
comment Opposite of anthropomorphise
@Robusto No, it would clearly be disanthropomorphesis.
May
12
comment What are the 'distances' among the major English dialects?
@TimLymington You are quite correct. I pronounced it Ed-in-burg (Which, consequently, is how you pronounce the name of a city in Texas which is spelled without the "h") until I learned that it's a lot closer to Ed-in-borough (without fully pronouncing the last syllable).
May
10
comment What are some slang words for “police” in countries besides the US?
@MikeVaughan Etymology is plenty for my taste... but I'd love to see a slightly more comprehensive list.
May
10
comment What are some slang words for “police” in countries besides the US?
50 points (and accepted answer) for whoever wants to put together an English-only list with (concise) etymologies
May
9
comment What is the correct tense to use for a sentence like this?
It's two separate clauses, each in a different tense. While it doesn't make much sense without any context, the only grammatical error in the sentence is that there should be a comma before the and.
May
6
comment “B&W” or “B/W”?
I think some would contrast black or white with shades of gray, but I was referring to the abbreviation of black and white as opposed to color
May
6
comment Isn’t a word missing?
@Mitch then our hypothetical quoter should ask a question here, quoting the sentence and saying, "I'm trying to use this quote from X but am pretty sure there is a gramatical mistake somewhere. Can someone tell me where the [sic] belongs or if I'm mistaken and it's actually correct?"
May
6
comment Isn’t a word missing?
@Mitch If you make a mistake (with or without [sic]), it's a mistake, and that's that. If it is still in a state in which it can be corrected, it should be. If [sic] is in the text you are quoting, then you leave it in, as the person you are directly quoting also noticed a mistake in what he has quoted. [sic] is simply a device to save time/space to assure your reader you did not make a mistake. If it troubles you that much, don't use it, and use the time and space to explicitly inform your reader of what is and is not mistaken in your quote.
May
6
comment Isn’t a word missing?
@Mitch [sic] is explicitly placed immediately after a mistake (whether misspelling, word omission or otherwise) to indicate to the reader that the mistake was in the original text/statement rather than a typo on your part.
May
5
comment Pronunciation of “zounds?”
@gpr I guess I was hoping for an audio of the [əʊ] diphthong... but I searched through the IPA verbs enough to get an idea of how it might sound.
May
5
comment Isn’t a word missing?
Since you are quoting it, I would suggest you simply write "...Mr. Gilani that [sic] he did not believe..." (you may have already known that, but I decided to open my fat mouth/fingers anyway)
May
5
comment What's the proper past tense of “to freeze”: “freezed” or "frozen?
@MatthewRead I'm sorry that my word choice has caused such distress. I have duly modified my answer.
May
5
comment What's the proper past tense of “to freeze”: “freezed” or "frozen?
@MatthewRead half a million hits on google... maybe not that common.
May
3
comment What preposition should one use with “redundant”?
I'm not sure a preposition would be appropriate... I'd just say A and B are redundant.
May
2
comment What's a good word for a person that's being followed?
I think leader or quarry, depending on context
May
2
comment “I saw your lesson request, but when I saw *it* it was late”
I think both *it*s are pronouns... though I may be mistaken.