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Language enthusiast


Jun
7
comment Why does “is” replace “has”?
@Peter & @tenfour: I think you guys actually have the right answer. One of you may want to post it as such. I often say such things as this song 'əs been written... meaning has, not is.
Jun
7
comment What's the reason for the difference in pronunciation between “dispatch” and “dispatcher”?
@Thomson: yes, I looked in a few common online dictionaries and found no discrepancy in pronunciation.
Jun
5
comment Is “I am sat” bad English?
I'm afraid you are not arguing with me but with the authors of the New Oxford American Dictionary. Feel free to take it up with them.
Jun
5
comment Is “I am sat” bad English?
Sit yourself down, and I'll bring you some coffee. -from NOAD
Jun
3
comment Why are the people of the United States called “Americans” when the whole continent is “America”
@Mitch those of the latter call us both estadounidenses (Unitedstatesians) and norteamericanos (North Americans)
Jun
2
comment “At various occasions” versus “on various occasions”
@Brennan. Agreed; however, I believe we would be amiss to ignore that I like to eat broccoli at various occasions would be perfectly acceptable as long as by occasions you mean events, such as parties, balls, galas, Bar-Mitzvahs, etc.
Jun
2
comment Is “I'd've” proper use of the English language?
+1 for the insane contraction; however, being that wouldn't, couldn't and shouldn't don't (and don't for that matter) have an apostrophe before the n, I must insist upon I'dn't've rather than your proposed spelling.
Jun
1
comment Word that means “healing” or “spiritually healing”?
Which actually comes from the Greek θεραπεύω, meaning to heal.
May
31
comment How to use “you” word in a way that suggests it's singular/plural form?
+1 For mentioning Adams
May
31
comment Is it “flavor saver” or “flavor savor”?
@Kit, well I appreciate your kindness in selecting myself.
May
27
comment Can “let us” always be used in place of “let's”?
@nohat granted. I guess I wasn't thinking about the possibility of word order, as "Didn't you know?" is a contraction of "Did you not know?" rather than "Did not you know?"
May
26
comment Word for “distance in time”
Related: Is there a single word for a “unit of time”?
May
26
comment A word to describe “people I care about”
@xaoil, sorry I thought you were looking for people who are important to me or whom I care about. They could be family, friends, or just people I adore.
May
25
comment How many of the “Top 10 favorite British words” are understood by Americans?
I only know prat, does that make me one 7th of an intelligent American?
May
24
comment Literal meaning of “to give a run for someone's money”
I'm not sure there is a literal meaning per se. Are you requesting the etymology of the phrase?
May
23
comment Should it be 10 US$ or US$ 10?
in Spanish, the word order of Dólares Estadounidenses would not lend toward US$ but something closer to $US, DE, $E, or $EEUU (which is the Latin American equivalent of USA). I just thought it interesting that they instead replace the S of US with a dollar symbol.
May
22
comment Should it be 10 US$ or US$ 10?
does that mean that a reference in a comment to how something is represented in a non-English speaking environment is pretentious and uncalled for?
May
21
comment Should it be 10 US$ or US$ 10?
In Argentina (and possibly other Latin American countries) they write 10 U$
May
19
comment To use “test” as an adjectival noun, is the proper form “test” or “testing”?
I was not referring to specific grammatical rules but rather to what a native speaker in the engineering field would understand if you said I work with a test engineer or I work with a testing engineer. Test engineer is a term that refers to an engineer who performs/creates tests. Testing engineer is not.
May
19
comment To use “test” as an adjectival noun, is the proper form “test” or “testing”?
A test engineer is an engineer who performs tests. A testing engineer would generally be someone who tests one's patience.