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4h
revised Word meaning “to fall down accidentally?”
added 307 characters in body
4h
answered Word meaning “to fall down accidentally?”
7h
awarded  Explainer
14h
awarded  Good Answer
1d
comment Which verb describes the movement of a flag or clothes on clothes line?
Most generally, waving.
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comment Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
@user3847: You asked for a noun. Welch and welcher are used as a noun for someone that doesn't pay a small debt. It could be that they borrowed money as well. I gave this answer because you said other answers do not fit, yet you chose the answer that you thought it does not fit before.
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awarded  Nice Answer
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comment An English idiom for “solve a problem that has been solved”?
@FumbleFingers: Yes, but as I said "flogging a dead horse" covers more situations. OP mentioned other situations in the question where "flogging a dead horse" is more appropriate to use, in my opinion. I'm flogging a dead horse here I guess :)
2d
comment “pros and cons”, “black and white”, “ups and downs”. Always in a fixed sequence, is there a word or phrase for these?
I wonder if there is a quadrinomial also...
2d
comment An English idiom for “solve a problem that has been solved”?
@GreenAsJade: The question is not asking that implicitly. It is just the title of the question to summarize it. And now you agree with me. I appreciate your comment but it is not considering all the details. The question body is mentioning various contexts and in my opinion, "reinventing the wheel" doesn't cover all. It has a more limited usage than "flogging a dead horse"
2d
comment An English idiom for “solve a problem that has been solved”?
@GreenAsJade: -1 to you also. Question has more details in it and read the definition. Flogging a dead horse is used in various contexts and one of them is wasting effort on something that is resolved or settled.
Sep
27
revised Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
added 444 characters in body
Sep
27
answered Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
Sep
27
comment Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
Ok I will add that an answer and retract my close vote but maybe you can add more details about why moocher, leech, sponge, scrounger etc. do not fit.
Sep
27
comment Is there a slang word or idiom for someone who borrows money from friends or relatives and never (or rarely) pays them back?
How about welch or welcher? Though it is usually used in betting/gambling.
Sep
27
revised Is there a “universal use” English equivalent of the Japanese ubiquitous greeting, “Yoroshiku onegaishimasu”?
added 1 character in body
Sep
27
revised Is there a “universal use” English equivalent of the Japanese ubiquitous greeting, “Yoroshiku onegaishimasu”?
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Sep
27
comment Is there a “universal use” English equivalent of the Japanese ubiquitous greeting, “Yoroshiku onegaishimasu”?
@Mynamite: "Thank you" doesn't cover all the situations that "Yoroshiku onegaishimasu" covers but it is more universal than "Nice to meet you" in my opinion and covers more situations. I didn't give that as an equivalent also, I mentioned as a comparison. ""Yoroshiku onegaishimasu" is not only used for greetings also. All the details are in my answer. I clarified more points today with my edit also, let me know if anything is not clear.
Sep
27
answered Verb for calling a phone only with the intention of letting it ring
Sep
27
revised Is there a “universal use” English equivalent of the Japanese ubiquitous greeting, “Yoroshiku onegaishimasu”?
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