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14h
suggested rejected edit on What is the difference between “etiquette”, “courtesy”, and “manners”?
15h
revised What is the difference between “etiquette”, “courtesy”, and “manners”?
Added definitions, directly addressed link from question, and added manner vs manners
17h
revised What is the difference between “etiquette”, “courtesy”, and “manners”?
corrected spelling
18h
answered What is the difference between “etiquette”, “courtesy”, and “manners”?
Feb
5
comment Is “technical possible (to do something)” the same as “technically possible”?
Have you looked up "technical" and "technically" to see what parts of speech they are? Can you include that in your answer, and tell why you need more information? And post where you read the expression?
Feb
5
reviewed No Action Needed People of different ages who share the same birthday
Feb
5
reviewed Reviewed Can we say “to drink out” (similar to “eat out”) to mean to drink away from home?
Feb
4
awarded  Yearling
Feb
4
answered Verb for gradual learning
Feb
1
comment What's the meaning of the phrase?
Can you post the explanations that don't work so we don't have to duplicate your work? And tell why they don't make sense, so we don't post more that make no sense in the same way?
Feb
1
answered What does 'project-plugging' mean here? Also can any other constructions be formed using '~plugging'?
Jan
31
reviewed Reviewed What is the difference between 'in the bed' and 'in bed'?
Jan
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
29
answered Can't Understand Sentence Containing Word “Keep The Difference”
Jan
29
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
I took the OP to mean that the house was lavish outside, but the person was starving inside. This has been true of house poor people I have known who have no table to eat at or chair to sit in because they bought too fancy a home.
Jan
29
answered Need help identifying epistrophe
Jan
29
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
@DJClayworth How is it reversed? Lavish outside corresponds with high expenditures on home ownership and maintenance. Starving inside corresponds with low expenditures on discretionary items. Those who are house poor live like the poor because they spent all their money on their house.
Jan
29
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
Twitter, blogs, and internet comment sections are filled with vernacular and can usually be linked to.
Jan
29
revised Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
Added quote from census
Jan
29
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
Can you find a reference work or a literary quote to support this?