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comment Why do English writers avoid explicit numerals?
tolérance: here, a small departure from the norm which is tolerated, accepted, not rejected outright but not advised or recommended as the best or official or regulated way. Also used in the meaning of a tiny distance in measurement for a part or a setting in a machine that does not block or even facilitate the operation of the machine.
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reviewed Approve How does one correctly use “q.v.”?
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comment If the plural of ‘man’ is ‘men,’ shouldn’t the plural of ‘German’ be ‘Germen’?
Three remarks germānus in Latin, means originally: close, coming from the same stem, having the same father, then true, proved, genuine, of good quality, on which you can rely (as should be the trust you have in your brother). It is a very common adjective in the classical language. One interpretation is that by transfer, it became the name of those tribes east of the Rhine that looked alike for those who lived west of the Rhine. Germen exists in Latin as a noun it means a sprout, a bud, an offshoot. Hermano meaning brother in Spanish comes from the Latin germanus.
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comment How many of the “Top 10 favorite British words” are understood by Americans?
@Yoichi: twee would certainly be a nice equivalent of "kawaï" かわいい in some contexts.
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comment How many of the “Top 10 favorite British words” are understood by Americans?
@Yoichi: these are not "Top 10 Favorite British Words" in general. These are the "top 10 favorite British words" of the american editors of the online Merriam-Webster american dictionary. They have been chosen more for exotism to american ears than for frequent usage among the British.