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seen Aug 5 at 18:45

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comment If the plural of ‘man’ is ‘men,’ shouldn’t the plural of ‘German’ be ‘Germen’?
Three remarks germānus in Latin, means originally: close, coming from the same stem, having the same father, then true, proved, genuine, of good quality, on which you can rely (as should be the trust you have in your brother). It is a very common adjective in the classical language. One interpretation is that by transfer, it became the name of those tribes east of the Rhine that looked alike for those who lived west of the Rhine. Germen exists in Latin as a noun it means a sprout, a bud, an offshoot. Hermano meaning brother in Spanish comes from the Latin germanus.
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May
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comment How many of the “Top 10 favorite British words” are understood by Americans?
@Yoichi: twee would certainly be a nice equivalent of "kawaï" かわいい in some contexts.
May
25
comment How many of the “Top 10 favorite British words” are understood by Americans?
@Yoichi: these are not "Top 10 Favorite British Words" in general. These are the "top 10 favorite British words" of the american editors of the online Merriam-Webster american dictionary. They have been chosen more for exotism to american ears than for frequent usage among the British.
May
24
comment “'n'” as an abbreviation for “and” as in “rock 'n' roll”
@Al, @Matt : thanks. I had such musical examples just in front on my nose and did not see them.
May
24
asked “'n'” as an abbreviation for “and” as in “rock 'n' roll”
May
23
comment What does ‘Camel gets his nose under the tent’ mean?
Or a french one: give them the hand, they will take the arm.
May
23
comment Where did “I'm Jonesing” get its meaning from?
So "keeping up with the Joneses" would mean "have a constant supply of "?
May
22
comment Use of “although” with a modifier
you mean "has had the power" ?