658 reputation
1714
bio website undermyhat.org
location Amsterdam, The Netherlands
age
visits member for 4 years
seen Aug 13 at 17:27

"Logic gets you from A to B. Imagination takes you everywhere"

Creator of the .NET XSLT 3.0 processor: Exselt

You can reach me via Twitter, by mail info@exselt.net, on my blog Under My Hat, my outsourcing and consultancy firm Abrasoft or at Exselt.net.


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
2
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
1
revised What word or phrase expresses briefly detaining a suspect on the street and then letting him/her go?
sp mistake in title
Mar
27
awarded  Yearling
Mar
3
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
12
awarded  Good Question
May
9
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
20
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
12
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
27
accepted Can “number” in “number one” possibly be a Dutchism or a Germanism?
Nov
26
comment Can “number” in “number one” possibly be a Dutchism or a Germanism?
Interesting, and glad you were able to track the Latin phrases. In 1689, the Dutch King William III ruled over England, Ireland and Scotland, and the Dutch royal family has since been of some influence, but I'd find it a bit far-stretched to give them credit for influencing the language as well. Then again, English has of course many roots in Diets and Danish, but those predate the 19th century by far.
Nov
26
comment Can “number” in “number one” possibly be a Dutchism or a Germanism?
@MattЭллен: yes, or in the meaning of "you are the number one", which has a similar meaning, not necessarily "winner", but closer to "the best, or foremost" (sorry, I'm not native... ;)
Nov
26
asked Can “number” in “number one” possibly be a Dutchism or a Germanism?
Aug
18
awarded  Yearling
Jun
29
accepted Is “and then some” an offensive expression?
Jun
29
comment Is “and then some” an offensive expression?
Arm's length? As in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arm%27s_length_principle? But bottom line, I gather there is a judgmental tone to it.
Jun
29
asked Is “and then some” an offensive expression?
Jun
26
comment Would you use the term cucumber-time and why?
@AndrewLeach: it reads In England kennt man die Saure-Gurken-Zeit unter dem Namen „season of the very smallest potatoes“ oder auch „cucumbertime“ (Gurkenzeit).. This means, literally: In England they know the "Saure-Gurken-Zeit" by the term "season of the very smallest potatoes" and also as "cucumbertime". But it seems to me that the author got it wrong.
Jun
26
accepted Would you use the term cucumber-time and why?
Jun
25
revised Would you use the term cucumber-time and why?
added update with references