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Nov
12
awarded  Famous Question
Sep
6
comment Are collective nouns always plural, or are certain ones singular?
@ShreevatsaR and phoog, According to this Channel 9 dicussion on Microsoft are/is, "Microsoft are" is not uncommon. The number of hits you use to distinguish between correct and false, may just as well be the difference between American usage and the rest of the world.
Apr
15
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
25
comment I'll take you home / I'll bring you home
Interesting observations, would you happen to also know some authorative references to these regional distinctions?
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
2
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
1
revised What word or phrase expresses briefly detaining a suspect on the street and then letting him/her go?
sp mistake in title
Mar
27
awarded  Yearling
Mar
3
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
12
awarded  Good Question
May
9
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
20
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
12
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
27
accepted Can “number” in “number one” possibly be a Dutchism or a Germanism?
Nov
26
comment Can “number” in “number one” possibly be a Dutchism or a Germanism?
Interesting, and glad you were able to track the Latin phrases. In 1689, the Dutch King William III ruled over England, Ireland and Scotland, and the Dutch royal family has since been of some influence, but I'd find it a bit far-stretched to give them credit for influencing the language as well. Then again, English has of course many roots in Diets and Danish, but those predate the 19th century by far.
Nov
26
comment Can “number” in “number one” possibly be a Dutchism or a Germanism?
@MattЭллен: yes, or in the meaning of "you are the number one", which has a similar meaning, not necessarily "winner", but closer to "the best, or foremost" (sorry, I'm not native... ;)
Nov
26
asked Can “number” in “number one” possibly be a Dutchism or a Germanism?
Aug
18
awarded  Yearling
Jun
29
accepted Is “and then some” an offensive expression?
Jun
29
comment Is “and then some” an offensive expression?
Arm's length? As in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arm%27s_length_principle? But bottom line, I gather there is a judgmental tone to it.