2,480 reputation
516
bio website teylyn.com
location New Zealand
age
visits member for 3 years
seen yesterday

Microsoft MVP - Excel

twitter: @IngeborgNZ


Apr
10
comment What does “to give up someone ” mean?
Why the downvote? If you downvote, please post a comment with your rationale.
Mar
27
comment Gender neutral term for “maiden name”?
@WS2: it's not the OP who posted that racial slur, but David M. in the comment.
Mar
27
comment Gender neutral term for “maiden name”?
@WS2, actually, I object to the assumption that Americans are ignorant per se and that a wrong application of a French word is OK because Americans won't be able to tell the difference.
Mar
27
comment Another Achievement Verbs with the Progressive Aspect
Please edit your question. The quoted sentence from the book is not correct English. Achievement verbs are usually cannot occur with stop or start. If this is indeed what is written in the book, then please throw the book away. Otherwise, please post the correct sentence here.
Mar
27
comment Gender neutral term for “maiden name”?
The question does not state that it is geared just at Americans, though, does it? I am German and live in New Zealand. To me and many others (Americans, British, second language English speakers and anyone else) the use of née is definitely bound to the female gender. You can't just say that it will work because most Americans cannot tell the difference. That's rather racist, IMHO.
Mar
10
comment How to pronounce “80x86”, “Linux 2.6”, and “Figure 3-1”?
What I said. It depends on the context. If you discuss the architecture, the wording will be different than if you discuss the processor. So, you need to be clear about the context that is discussed. You cannot expect one correct answer for a phrase that can be either X or Y. You need to provide the context for a correct answer.
Mar
10
comment What is the difference between “a” and “per”?
the first (an hour) is English wording and the second (per hour) is using Latin. What's the problem?
Feb
12
comment Why does “quadratic” describe second power while “quad” usually describes “four”?
I'm very bad with math. if we have an integer, and construct a square with that number of items on each side, the total number will be its second power. I don't get how this works. If I have a square and each side is the number 2, the total is 8, not 2^2 = 4. If I have a square and each side is the number 3, the total is 12, not 3^2 = 9. How exactly does that number of items on each side get applied?
Jan
9
comment Why does the pronunciation of “U” vary in English?
Reminds me of: "Dearest Creature in Creation, study English pronunciation. I will teach you in my verse sounds like corpse, corps, horse and worse." Goes on for several pages, too.
Aug
13
comment Opposite of change?
Can you explain in more words than one what the opposite would be in your words? Change means what is left over after you subtract what is yours. How can there be an opposite of that?
Aug
13
comment Is it incorrect to say “If you could”?
Could you back up your claim with a source?
Jul
19
comment Proverb or expression for a situation with two choices, both leading to a different kind of trouble
Devils? I know The lesser of two evils. Unless you mean the short film
Jul
1
comment I need one-word expression for “Ignoring someone intentionally”
Hmm, in what way can "ignore" be not intentional? Can you give an example? Happy to widen my horizon. For me, ignoring is something that is done actively, despite circumstances that may be set against my intention to ignore, but not accidentally. The accidental case would be to "miss something happening" or some such. "Ignoring" implies intent, because you can only ignore what you are aware of. If you are not aware of it, you may miss it happening, but in order to ignore something you have to know it exists in the first place.
Jul
1
comment Why is there no comma before “and” before this independent clause?
Jos, do you have a background of German? Because in German, (at least before they Neue Rechtschreibung), two clauses connected with "und" will require a comma before the "und", when both clauses are complete in their own right. This may be a wrong transference to English. Tom fuhr nach Frankreich, und Dick fuhr nach Belgien. The comma is required in German, not in English.
Jun
19
comment Where do you put the suffix when listing the last name first?
That does not answer the question: "... when listing the last name first"!
Jun
11
comment He began to breathe deep / deeply
@Myself: can you show a quote reference? The only result Google brings up for 'He began to breathe deep' is this question and a few quotes that include more words after deep that justify the use of deep as an adjective instead of an adverb.
Jun
11
comment He began to breathe deep / deeply
I'm confused deep. Is there a question in your post?
Jun
7
comment Offer / Quotation / Proposal?
"apposite sex"? really?
Jun
7
comment Is “used in anger” a Britishism for something?
Welcome to ELU. Can you back up your statements with references to sources?
May
29
comment Single word to describe positive, matured, or loving attitude towards life
I already did that before I posted the comment. You can see the edits to learn where your punctuation and capitalisation is wanting.