304 reputation
14
bio website tonyandrews.blogspot.com
location London, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 4 years
seen Aug 21 at 9:18

I have been working with Oracle databases for over 15 years, including a couple of years working as a Senior Consultant for Oracle UK Ltd. Now I work as an independent consultant specialising in design and build of Oracle databases and applications, particularly using Oracle Application Express.

I also play lead guitar in a great band called The Love Handles.


Sep
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
31
awarded  Caucus
Aug
19
awarded  Yearling
Oct
29
answered Is there a difference between “arse” and “ass”?
Oct
28
comment Is there a difference between “arse” and “ass”?
Not entirely relevant, but I once had an email of mine rejected by a PC "profanity checker" for using the word "butt" as in "the butt of the joke". I found that changing "butt" to "arse" made it apparently more acceptable.
Oct
13
comment Interjection “et voilà”
'By the way, none of these, including "voila", require a "mock French accent"'. It does when I say it ;-)
Oct
12
comment Interjection “et voilà”
@Kosmonaut: in my view, if it was an English word it would be pronounced something like "voyla". We say "manoovre" not "manervr", because "manoeuvre" has become a true English word. Any word you have to put on a mock French accent to say isn't, in my view, an English word. Even if it is considered to be an English word by some/all dictionaries, it is still qualitatively different from words that have been totally absorbed into English. As for it being understood, so is "merci" but it isn't English!
Oct
12
comment Interjection “et voilà”
@Kosmonaut: I don't consider "voila" to be an English word at all - it is a French word that gets used in English writing in the same way that other foreign words like "n'est-ce pas?" get used, usualy in italics. Very different from, say "acrobat".
Sep
8
answered Can a sentence start with “Because”?
Sep
8
comment What does “had had” mean? How does this differ from “had”?
Once you have that cracked try the meta-version, where 2 schoolboys were trying to write that sentence: "Smith while Jones had had 'had had had had had had had had' had had ..." - well, you get the idea...
Aug
18
awarded  Teacher
Aug
18
answered “Irregardless” vs. “irrespective”
Aug
18
comment “Neither Michael nor Albert is correct” or “Neither Michael nor Albert are correct”?
@vanden, I think what Skilldrick means is to rephrase it as an exercise, and then choose "Neither Michael nor Albert is correct" on that basis.
Aug
18
awarded  Supporter
Aug
18
comment When should I use “a” versus “an” in front of a word beginning with the letter h?
I too hear this a lot particularly on BBC Radio 4. It irritates me immensely for some reason! Surely either "a historic" or "an 'istoric" if you want to sound Frenchified?!