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Jan
29
comment What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
It is curious that the Greek word theoremata only seems to exist in Latin texts. Why would people use a Greek plural when writing Latin?
Jan
29
comment What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
Google ngrams makes a nice picture for lemmata. I would paste it if I could.
Jan
29
comment What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
I see lemmata is even listed in the OED as a possible plural form.
Jan
29
accepted What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
Jan
29
comment What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
@JanusBahsJacquet Hmm.. How can you ever use "the bends" as a plural?
Jan
29
comment What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
@JanusBahsJacquet Can you find any written evidence of "stigma" in its religious form? I feel that in modern English the singular and plural are entirely different words now.
Jan
29
comment What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
@JanusBahsJacquet The singular of stigmata in the religious form it is commonly used is not stigma. It is an independent concept which doesn't have a separate singular I would argue. Like happiness.
Jan
29
comment When did the word cutlery first include spoons and forks?
That's a great quote. Thank you.
Jan
29
comment What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
@AndrewLeach What about llamata ... :)
Jan
29
comment What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
@AndrewLeach I accept the point however we do sometimes use plurals that reflect the etymology of a word. For example formulae and formulas are both in use. Not to mention schemas and schemata.
Jan
29
comment What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
Thank you. To answer your question directly, only for linguistic amusement.
Jan
29
asked What is the formal plural of the word theorem?
Jan
29
comment When did the word cutlery first include spoons and forks?
I think some evidence is needed for this. askandyaboutclothes.com/lifestyle/… is interesting as is cutleryorigins.webs.com . Your 18th century quotations seem too early to refer to table forks as we would recognise them. I particularly like " Many British clergymen were vehemently opposed to forks; they believed that only human fingers were worthy of touching God’s food.". Another small point, the middle ages ended around 1500 so that is not the time we are talking about.
Jan
29
revised When did the word cutlery first include spoons and forks?
added 219 characters in body
Jan
29
comment When did the word cutlery first include spoons and forks?
It is not clear to me that the word "fork" in these examples refers to table forks. At some point, possibly very recently, the word in British English came to mean eating utensils almost exclusively.
Jan
28
comment Where is the word “cutlery” in common usage
@PeterShor I posted a separate question about the first use of cutlery in its modern meaning. I suspect now it might be very recent.
Jan
28
asked When did the word cutlery first include spoons and forks?
Jan
28
comment Where is the word “cutlery” in common usage
@PeterShor Yes you are right. So the term must have acquired its current usage more recently. It also indicates how they referred to spoons and forks before the current usage of the term cutlery.
Jan
28
comment Where is the word “cutlery” in common usage
@PeterShor bit.ly/1i8ATUd is rather nice. If you search Google books for "table cutlery" in the 19th century you get quite a few similar adverts. I feel that before that the concept just wasn't common.
Jan
28
comment Where is the word “cutlery” in common usage
@PeterShor cutleryorigins.webs.com is reasonably informative and plausible on this front. "The first forks were actually imported from Italy, and they became more mass produced in the 19th century, when every household would start to get them to use as part of their everyday routine. " .. "Spoons were the latest piece of cutlery to hit the UK. Although they had been around since early civilisation, in northern Europe they had been made out of wood for many years. They finally became more used in England in the 19th century, when drinking soup became seen as more rude."