3,529 reputation
1215
bio website
location Munich, Germany
age 71
visits member for 11 months
seen 2 hours ago

Interested in English and French, education as a teacher for English and French, for some years a private teacher for adults, now no teaching activity. I have taught Latin to pupils and have had a look into several languages, eg Dutch, Afrikaans, Italian, Spanish, Greek, Russian, Arabic, Turkish, Hungarian, Sanskrit, and Esperanto. I would like to know a bit more about Chinese, Japanese, some other languages of South East Asia, and Suaheli, but time is lacking. I have great interest for etymology, which I have been interested in for 50 years, and often my views differ from those in etymological dictionaries. I'm interested in the mysteries of grammar, in idioms, in new methods of teaching languages and I am enthusiasted by the possibilities the Internet offers and modern electronic devices such as electronic dictionaries. A pity that Youtube has not discovered yet that videos are an ideal means for language learning, but they don't seem to have any interest in this side of videos.


1h
answered I could hear something rattling/rattle
1d
comment How do we know if learning some of the new words are necessary or a waste of energy?
I would say it is a rare word, Latin, a historical term for a special servant. If English is a foreign language for you you won't find that word in the next time. I think you have to read Ģoethe's Faust to find that word. I would learn words by reading novels and not from lists.
1d
answered Is it absolutely necessary to use “than” over “then” in a comparison?
1d
comment What is the difference between “comprehend” and “understand”?
"to comprehend" is the Latin variant of the normal word "to understand". "to comprehend" is written elevated style.
1d
comment Connotations of “Salt of the earth”
To me this biblical comparison in an everyday situation seems a bit out of the way.
2d
answered Where does “on one's last legs” come from?
2d
answered How do we know if learning some of the new words are necessary or a waste of energy?
Dec
21
answered “Foxen” versus “oxes”
Dec
21
comment Understandable songs to learn English
Sorry to say it, but I don't think that you will learn much from songs though a lot of people think that is useful.
Dec
21
comment Part of Speech, adverb or adjective?
The use of easy as an adverb without a special ending is comparable to German where the position before an adjective shows its function of adverb. Possibly it is German influence.
Dec
18
comment Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE
Interesting idea.
Dec
17
accepted Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE
Dec
17
answered What word describes languages that are written left-to-right, top-to-bottom?
Dec
16
revised Etymology of orchard
added 34 characters in body
Dec
16
comment Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE
@Mari-Lou - I don't know how it is possible to contact you so I do it here. I have long thought about what might be the best answer. Now I think you should give the bounty to Ellen Colingsworth. Her suggestion Scottisch neuk which is nook (corner) is a hypothesis with a high probability, i.e. it might be possible that nook was changed to neck, perhaps because nook was not well-known. Nicole would be in second place for points, because she hinted at someone else who had doubts about the traditional explanation.
Dec
16
answered Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE
Dec
16
comment Why do we use the article “the” with the Matterhorn (a mountain)?
Probably the use of the definite article reflects German usage. Names of mountain peaks are used with the article: das Matterhorn, der Watzmann, die Zugspitze.
Dec
16
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
16
comment Why is the action of removing a digital file named “Delete”?
@Ooker - You are right, I gave the meaning of the Latin verb. In English delete is mainly used for eliminating written text or a word and computer data. OALD says: to delete sth (from sth) meaning to remove sth that has been written or printed, or that has been stored on a computer.
Dec
15
comment Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE
Wow! Algonquin naiack. Interesting theory.