4,288 reputation
1517
bio website
location Munich, Germany
age 71
visits member for 1 year
seen 2 hours ago

Interested in English and French, education as a teacher for English and French, for some years a private teacher for adults, now no teaching activity. I have taught Latin to pupils and have had a look into several languages, eg Dutch, Afrikaans, Italian, Spanish, Greek, Russian, Arabic, Turkish, Hungarian, Sanskrit, and Esperanto. I would like to know a bit more about Chinese, Japanese, some other languages of South East Asia, and Suaheli, but time is lacking. I have great interest for etymology, which I have been interested in for 50 years, and often my views differ from those in etymological dictionaries. I'm interested in the mysteries of grammar, in idioms, in new methods of teaching languages and I am enthusiasted by the possibilities the Internet offers and modern electronic devices such as electronic dictionaries. A pity that Youtube has not discovered yet that videos are an ideal means for language learning, but they don't seem to have any interest in this side of videos.


2h
comment Do 'learn by heart' & 'learn by rote' mean the same?
You should say whether this is your personal interpretation or whether you have some clear evidence. As the etymology of "rote" is unclear I don't see how you can say they are not the same.
2h
comment Do 'learn by heart' & 'learn by rote' mean the same?
By the way, the etymology of "by rote" is unclear (Oxford). I would guess it was shortened from "by routine".
3h
comment Do 'learn by heart' & 'learn by rote' mean the same?
I think the two expressions mean the same. I assume that in some regions "by heart"is more common and in others "by rote". There is a tendency to assume that there must be a difference when there are two expressions for the same idea. And such speculations sprout like grass.
3h
answered The etymology of February
4h
revised Translation of Merkel Speech in Auschwitz
added 194 characters in body
4h
answered Translation of Merkel Speech in Auschwitz
5h
comment Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE
The more I think about this problem the more I am convinced that behind this special "neck" stands ultimately nook as in "in every nook and cranny" and Ellen Collingsworth's variant neuk would be the missing link between "nook" and the "neck in the woods".
5h
comment “Liberty” versus “freedom”
In my view liberty, of Latin origin, and freedom, of Germanic origin, mean exactly the same. If the two words were or are used with slightest differences in certain documents or by special writers it is a special thing of those documents or writers. But definitions of a difference are interpretations by individual persons and are nothing but hairsplitting.
5h
answered “for good” expression in an unfortunate event?
5h
revised Is a thumb also a finger?
added 5 characters in body
6h
answered Is a thumb also a finger?
16h
comment Why is Greece not called in English by the name Hellas?
Yes, but Greek did not have the same importance as Latin in western Europe.
18h
answered Why is Greece not called in English by the name Hellas?
1d
answered Which is correct: “rack my brain” or “wrack my brain”?
1d
comment fun - part of speech
I've just found a pair like heavyweight and a heavy weight. It would not be appropriate to say heavy is an adjective in both cases. Actually that explains nothing and you don't see what is meant.
1d
comment fun - part of speech
There are dictionaries or grammars which have special terms such as combining form.
1d
answered Is there any other category besides prose and verse, for classification of literature according to format?
1d
comment fun - part of speech
Compound nouns are dictionary entries. At least you find them in larger dictionaries. A combination of an adjective and a noun is normally not registered in dictionaries. With the exception of cases where adjective + noun are a fixed expression as red herring. But if a compond noun is decribed as adjective + noun it is totally unclear what is meant. The first compound element may be a normal adjective as in red herring or it may be a noun as in herring gull. And I think such differences should be described with clear terms.
2d
answered fun - part of speech
Jan
26
awarded  Yearling