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Apr
27
comment Why is it “ladies and gentlemen” instead of “gentlemen and ladies”?
I think politeness and order of deference is a more likely explanation. It is normally "my lords, ladies and gentlemen"
Mar
26
comment “God's own country”
I'd only ever heard of it said about Australia, generally only by Australians. Of course Australians are famously less reticent about expressing their opinions on their own country than the more repressed and reserved Americans
Mar
26
comment Can you “do” Science?
And Science was once a new term. Otherwise Hubble would be naturally philosophizing the shit out if .
Mar
26
comment What does AHD mean?
@WS2 unless there is something about ex-colonial, historical lexicographers that I'm not aware of - I don't think ADHD is a dupe of AHD
Mar
22
comment English nouns with two meanings? (i.e. homographs that are both nouns)
Although "mail" is from the same root, mesh or bag for keeping letters in and a metal mesh for keeping yourself in (and swords out)
Mar
21
comment Why use BCE/CE instead of BC/AD?
@Barmar - I don't, this is ENGLISH language and usage. The latins can get their own site
Mar
21
awarded  Yearling
Mar
14
answered IN and ON again
Mar
5
awarded  word-usage
Feb
4
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
25
comment Punching several tons above my weight
That's brilliant !
Jan
25
answered Punching several tons above my weight
Jan
19
comment Is there a word that includes laptops, desktops, Macs and PCs, but not mobile devices
So you buy separate "Laptop" versions of your PC software rather than the "desktop" version?
Jan
17
comment Is there a word that includes laptops, desktops, Macs and PCs, but not mobile devices
In the development world "desktop" means not mobile- there is no difference in developing code for a laptop and desktop PC.
Jan
17
answered Is there a word that includes laptops, desktops, Macs and PCs, but not mobile devices
Jan
4
comment Term for the Fear of Fictional Characters
You could always invent a term - if you are good enough at Greek !
Jan
1
answered Meaning of “not so apt to be solicited”
Dec
26
comment Why is the 12/26 holiday homonymic with the fistifcuffing sport?
@Billj - I meant that it wasn't that the family got to open gifts on the 25th and the poor workers had to wait. It was that nobody got presents on the religious holiday but workers got some sort of annual bonus gift.
Dec
26
comment Why is the 12/26 holiday homonymic with the fistifcuffing sport?
@HotLicks IIRC presents on Christmas day are a relatively recent invention (Victorian?). Certainly the C17 protestants wouldn't have approved
Dec
26
comment Why is the 12/26 holiday homonymic with the fistifcuffing sport?
@FumbleFingers I thought boxing day might be unfamiliar to those speakers in His Majesty's former colony.