721 reputation
39
bio website ericlippert.com
location Seattle, WA
age 41
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Apr 16 at 21:18

Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


Mar
20
awarded  Yearling
Mar
14
comment What does “thanks for sharing” mean?
Nice answer. The last section reminds me of a friend who used to work on environmental compliance for highway construction projects. Many governments require that the project's environmental impact plan be reviewed by the public and that all comments from the public be documented and replied to. Her job was, among other things, to reply publically to all such comments with "Comment noted." So now when someone brings up an argument which I'd like to not have, I just say "comment noted" and move on.
Feb
28
comment Where does the term “heads or tails” come from?
The two dollar coin is of course the rudest Canadian coin, as it shows the Queen with a bear behind.
Feb
27
awarded  Custodian
Feb
27
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is “legit” a legitimate word?
Feb
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
26
answered Is “legit” a legitimate word?
Feb
21
comment What is the term for when you become more aware of something?
A similar effect -- not quite what you describe, but you might be interested in it anyway -- is the observer-expectancy effect. That's when someone tells you "there will be unusually many blue cars on the road today" and suddenly hey, there are. But without the prompting you would not have come to that conclusion yourself.
Feb
4
comment What is a reasonable definition for “is”? What is the rule for inserting it in a sentence?
What am I thinking, "will" isn't a form of "to be". Eight. Eight forms. And Shakespearean English also had "beest". What a crazy verb.
Feb
4
comment What is a reasonable definition for “is”? What is the rule for inserting it in a sentence?
The verb "to be" is a very unusual verb. Most English verbs have four or five forms: jump, jumps, jumped, jumping. Drive, drives, drove, driven, driving. The verb "to be" is I believe the only one with nine: be, is, am, are, was, were, will, been, being. (And we've lost art, wast and wert, which are found in Shakespeare but not modern English.) It is highly irregular and it is difficult to describe to the non-English speaker precisely what all the rules are.
Feb
3
comment Can something be “extremely mediocre”?
Get two other people and play the following game. Everyone writes down a number between one and a million. The person with the number in the middle wins. Play this game, let's say a thousand times. The person with the middle number of wins is the champion. They are an extremely mediocre number namer. Or are they? Isn't the person who got the most numbers in the middle the most extremely mediocre? This seems to be a paradox. Who is really the most mediocre here?
Jan
30
comment Term describing the practice of anticipating dangers while driving
In "Traffic" by Tom Vanderbilt he describes a device which video-records instances where teenage drivers accelerate, brake or corner too hard and sends the videos to their instructors. One young student claimed to have found a way to beat the system: look far ahead, anticipate situations where an action was likely to be required, and slow down early and gradually. :-) If you're interested in driver psychology, it's an entertaining read.
Jan
24
answered What is the difference between Road, Avenue, Street?
Jan
23
comment actual / wise or both
There are some jargonish uses of "actual" as well. For example, the feature of the C# programming language that came to be called "partial methods" was originally called "latent and actual methods". The idea being that a method could be "latent" -- like a glove with the right shape, but no hand in it, so you can't use it for any real work -- or it could be "actual" -- there's a hand in that glove and it can throw things. In that case "this method is latent, that method is actual" would make sense to those who knew the jargon, but it would be confusing otherwise.
Jan
16
comment Meaning of “dog” in the “updog” joke
This is a variation on a traditional joke that I love to use on ten-year-olds. "Do you have a henway in your kitchen?" "What's a henway?" "ABOUT FIVE POUNDS HA HA HA HA HA".
Jan
14
answered Word for individual who tips the balance
Dec
31
answered How to use 'dogly' correctly
Dec
30
revised What term refers to those who adhere to scientism?
added 145 characters in body
Dec
30
answered What term refers to those who adhere to scientism?
Dec
13
awarded  Yearling