750 reputation
39
bio website ericlippert.com
location Seattle, WA
age 41
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Sep 18 at 13:05

Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


Jul
3
comment What does “head the bill” mean?
Note that "head the bill" and "foot the bill" have nothing to do with each other. To "foot the bill" is to pay the whole cost of a large purchase.
Jun
24
comment Is there a word/phrase for “unperformant”?
@AaronBertrand: And I looked up "word" in a "proper" English dictionary, and it said a single distinct meaningful element of speech or writing, not a single distinct meaningful element of speech or writing found in a proper official dictionary. Since "performant" is a single distinct meaningful element of speech or writing, and since you like words such as "word" to be defined in proper dictionaries, we must logically conclude that "performant" is a word, and not a non-word.
Jun
24
comment Is there a word/phrase for “unperformant”?
@AaronBertrand: An official English dictionary? There is absolutely no such thing. There is no Academie Francaise equivalent in English, sorry. "Performant" is not a non-word; it's a perfectly cromulent word.
Jun
23
comment Is there a word/phrase for “unperformant”?
@Rupe is correct: efficiency is about benefit derived divided by total cost. Performance is related, but different. Performance is about identifying a particular cost and then ensuring that the program stays within its budget. For example: storing a million numbers that are always between 1 and 10 in 32 bit integers is inefficient in terms of memory cost per integer used, but may be highly performant in terms of parallelized operations per second due to proper alignment.
Jun
22
comment What is one’s mother-in-law’s mother-in-law called?
Grand-mother-outlaw?
Jun
19
comment How nutty are the terms “nut case”, “health nut” and “sports nut”?
I would add that the slang term "nutter" is a really quite rude term for a mentally ill person in Britain, but not used in Canada or the United States to my knowledge.
Jun
16
comment What is the correct usage of the word “Cartesian”?
@martinf: "Cartography" is Greek for "map writing" -- χάρτης γράφειν - and so it predates Rene Descartes by several millennia.
Jun
16
comment Etymology of the idiom “by and large”
"Taken aback" is another -- idiomatically meaning to be surprised by an unexpected negative event. A sailcraft is "taken aback" when - typically due to sudden wind shift or poor handling while turning towards the wind - it is being blown backwards with the wind on the wrong side of the sails. This is particularly dangerous when the ship is square-rigged.
Jun
12
comment Etymology of the idiom “by and large”
This is one of many phrases of nautical origin that people use idiomatically with no understanding of the original meaning. "Give some leeway" is similarly common; "leeway" is the result of unavoidable sideways deviation of a ship from its intended course, which must be considered when steering towards an upwind mark.
Jun
3
comment Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley
"With" can also imply that the thing was not an ingredient at all. "Beer is made with an enormous vat".
May
4
comment What is the correct usage of the word “Cartesian”?
Does your teacher also say that the Sherlock Holmes stories were set in Victorian's Era?
May
2
comment Can organisations personally determine pronunciation of their own brand name?
By contrast, Moleskine has by design no "official" pronounciation. Apparently Italians typically say "mo-lay-ski-nay" but I'm sure many Americans say "mole-skine", and everything in between.
May
2
comment Why is an actor sometimes called 'ham'?
Some fun and interesting notes on large hams can be found here: tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/LargeHam
Apr
28
comment What’s wrong with “After roasting the deer, the hunter extinguished the fire and then searched for a tree to hang it from”?
@Gary'sStudent: That was a joke. Prepositions are things you should never end a sentence WITH. Funny! Also, sentence fragments bad. And eschew obfuscatory sequipedalian language, avoid comma splices too.
Apr
28
comment What’s wrong with “After roasting the deer, the hunter extinguished the fire and then searched for a tree to hang it from”?
So you're saying that a preposition is a thing you should never end a sentence with?
Apr
23
comment Is there a single word that means “hitting the target but missing the point”?
dilbert.com/strips/comic/1995-11-13
Mar
20
awarded  Yearling
Mar
14
comment What does “thanks for sharing” mean?
Nice answer. The last section reminds me of a friend who used to work on environmental compliance for highway construction projects. Many governments require that the project's environmental impact plan be reviewed by the public and that all comments from the public be documented and replied to. Her job was, among other things, to reply publically to all such comments with "Comment noted." So now when someone brings up an argument which I'd like to not have, I just say "comment noted" and move on.
Feb
28
comment Where does the term “heads or tails” come from?
The two dollar coin is of course the rudest Canadian coin, as it shows the Queen with a bear behind.
Feb
27
awarded  Custodian