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I ♡ LaTeX


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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Informed
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Caucus
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comment What's the “opposite” of “any more”?
Shouldn't it be anymore? See english.stackexchange.com/questions/31167/anymore-vs-any-more
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awarded  Good Question
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awarded  Yearling
Jan
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comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
Wow, I'm looking forward to reading this, but now it's really time to go to bed.
Jan
18
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
@tchrist: It isn't necessarily the reader's fault, see my earlier comment. And yes, I'm actually a native speaker of German studying German at university, so I am familiar with the eszett issues. But perhaps I didn't formulate my question precisely enough; I'm not mainly interested in these ligatures that have become "regular letters" (graphemes) in specific languages (e.g. ß, œ, æ), but rather in typographic ligatures that are "optional" and highly depend on the font you're using.
Jan
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comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
@tchrist: Please go ahead and add an answer explaining your view; quoting Bringhurst will certainly be most enlightening. He's unfortunately not on my shelf.
Dec
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awarded  Nice Question
Dec
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comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
Indeed, we have the Rat für deutsche Rechtschreibung, but their orthographic rules don't say anything about the use of typographic ligatures. Your package would pay off in German just because of the Word Auflage (with {auf} and {lage} being separate morphemes), which you'll find in about every bibliography -- it means edition :)
Dec
7
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
We've gotta be careful not to intermix the terms syllable and morpheme. These units may, but don't necessarily have to coincide, e.g. purple has two syllables, but it is monomorphemic. The Latin compound words are a tricky case indeed, but I think I'd agree with you that {effic} is one morpheme, my reason being that no native speaker of English would use *{fic} as a morpheme productively, not even as a joke. Maybe we should get Alan Munn involved in this discussion, he could certainly provide some interesting insights, or help with your package.
Dec
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comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
That's awesome, I'm excited for your package! Is there any typographic reference manual or the like stating this rule? (I've heard the morpheme rule as well, but some reference would be nice.) Are you interested in undesired ligatures in other languages as well? I'd assume there are many German LaTeX aficionados who'd be willing to help you by collecting words.
Dec
7
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
@SigueSigueBen: If you compile a minimal \documentclass{article}\begin{document}ff fi fl\end{document} with an up-to-date pdfLaTeX, the resulting ligatures in the Computer Modern font will indeed be searchable. For other setups and fonts, adaptions may be necessary, though, see e.g. tex.stackexchange.com/questions/4397/….
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awarded  Student
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asked When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
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awarded  Analytical
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awarded  Quorum
Jul
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comment “Important that John bring/brings”
-1 if I could for "Although people commonly use the indicative instead of the subjunctive, that doesn't make it right." This is exactly how language change happens, and this is not a bad thing! I can assure you, in a hundred years, nobody will use the subjunctive, most certainly not in spoken language. As of today, there are some people who make a distinction between subjunctive and indicative, and it's nice to be able to decode this distinction, but other people simply don't use it, and there's nobody on this planet who can say that that is bad.