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visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Mar 19 '13 at 20:17

Mar
18
awarded  Yearling
Jul
24
answered What's the difference between “cup” and “glass”?
Jul
24
awarded  Caucus
Mar
18
awarded  Yearling
Apr
4
comment Are there commonly used words to denote different gradations of friendship in English?
It feels like this tries to make a 1-dimensional list out of 2-dimensional data: how well you know them & how much you like each other.
Mar
31
comment Should I use “who” or “whom” as the only word in a sentence?
If you say 'whom' in this context, it makes it sound like you're referring to the entity that was eaten.
Mar
31
comment Difference between “cross with you” and “angry with you”
It does make me think of Mary Poppins.
Mar
28
comment Why use “at” in this way?
In Portuguese of Portugal, this method is generally preferred over the gerund-participle. You would say "Estou a nadar" (I'm at swim). In Brazil, the opposite is true. You would say "Estou nadando" (I'm swimming). It's just the way people say things.
Mar
25
comment Does the term “comma separated” mean “Goodbye” in any way?
It's not standard, but it sounds like an awesome usage to implement. I long to see my wife, but for now... we're comma separated.
Mar
25
comment How to correctly specify a range of temperatures in both Fahrenheit and Celsius?
I think that's what Ben meant by 'absolute'. The gradations are the same, hence they're counterparts. But the reference points are different. Celsius uses the freezing point of water, Kelvin uses absolute absence of heat energy. They're not identical, but rather counterparts.
Mar
25
awarded  Editor
Mar
25
revised US usage of 'mad'
Added extra thought.
Mar
25
comment More on 'who should she see': what part of speech is 'should' in this phrase?
I think this usage comes from the subjunctive form: "If such should happen, we would be ready." When used in the subjunctive form, it gives the sense of chance or possibility. So it's not far from there to use it as a helping verb that also implies that the thing happened by chance.
Mar
25
answered US usage of 'mad'
Mar
25
comment Are there nouns that are always plural — have no plural counterpart?
Do words like 'Pants' or 'Glasses' (for the eyes) have a different qualification than those examples?
Mar
24
comment What is the historic process for converting vulgar words into simply rude words?
It's interesting to note further that 'rape' used to mean a more innocuous 'kidnapping' or 'taking away' without the sexual denotations it carries now.
Mar
24
awarded  Commentator
Mar
24
comment [Singular] Is/Are [Plural]?
It sounds weirder still when you use a first-person pronoun as the predicate nominative and modify a singular subject with a prepositional phrase ending in a plural: The oldest of my siblings is I. Or perhaps A family of happy people is we. Actually, I'm not sure about that one.
Mar
24
answered Does one differentiate A “from” B, or differentiate A “and” B?
Mar
24
answered Is there an alternative to “that much less”?