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  • 25 votes cast
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
26
comment Is “Saffer” an offensive term for a South African?
There is a saying: "If you don't want to Saffer, avoid the suffer", lol... oh, wait... maybe the other way around...
Jun
26
comment Is “Saffer” an offensive term for a South African?
Even though you don't answer the question or go into the details of etymology, your point is a useful rule of thumb, and very welcome.
May
14
comment One word for an unforeseen bad dream
unaccounted is not a good synonym for unforeseen. The first means "Something, after it happened, can not be explained" while the second is for "Not felt or realized beforehand".
May
14
comment One word for an unforeseen bad dream
How about unsuspected instead: "not known or thought to exist or be present; not imagined possible." The word unexpected does not resonate with the moral aspect, as it is more related to likelihood and probability, making it neutral.
Jan
28
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
21
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
11
awarded  Critic
Oct
24
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
7
answered “Already” at the beginning of a sentence
Mar
7
revised What is the correct word order between “have/had”, “been”, and “already” in statements?
modified the example sentences in response to comments
Feb
29
awarded  Supporter
Jan
2
comment Is it correct that “etc.” can not be used together in a sentence with “for example” and “such as”?
Since the question is tagged with grammar and the like, I thought to mention that the sentence does not have its problems in grammar, but — as indicated by the other answers — rather in semantics.
Nov
7
awarded  Editor
Apr
29
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
30
comment What is the correct word order between “have/had”, “been”, and “already” in statements?
The first and the third are indeed grammatically correct, but the second is plain wrong, not just in the UK. On the other hand, AFAIK, "in written English, emphasis is largely a matter of controlling the way a sentence ends. The last words of English sentences carry the strongest degree of emphasis", and it is exactly the case with this example. So I would say the third is the best. What do you think?
Mar
21
comment What is the correct word order between “have/had”, “been”, and “already” in statements?
That wasn't so convincing. Please give a reference to some authoritative source to verify your opinion.
Mar
20
awarded  Student
Mar
20
asked What is the correct word order between “have/had”, “been”, and “already” in statements?