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Aug
15
answered What do you call someone who does a favor for you?
Aug
15
revised “The book fell open”
edited title
Aug
2
answered What is a gender neutral word to describe an individual?
Jul
27
answered Word for Majboor - A person who is forced to do something because of the circumstances.
Jul
20
comment Archaic English new words: from a Nigerian
So, he's a pompous windbag. I've certainly heard Americans who speak this way too -- usually small-town mayors.
Jul
16
answered Not a malapropism but a … what?
Jul
12
answered How to punctuate “from [this is a list] to [this is a list]”?
Jul
12
revised Might sound trivial, but I'm irked by “non-trivial” and seeking alternatives
added 1 character in body
Jul
12
answered Might sound trivial, but I'm irked by “non-trivial” and seeking alternatives
Jul
8
comment Does anyone still use “skyrocket” in the original sense?
@Robusto actually, all joking aside, you're right: it's not a literal use -- it's yet another figurative use, albeit a different one!
Jul
8
comment Does anyone still use “skyrocket” in the original sense?
I keep thinking of the 70s hit song "sky rockets in the night… Afternoon delight "
Jul
8
answered “Dogs deride an old wolf”: What is the English equivalent of this German proverb?
Jul
8
answered “Bob and I.” or “Bob and me.”? when describing a picture
Jun
17
comment Translating the feeling and heritage of “Portugalidade” to proper English term
"Portugosity??"
Jun
17
answered Can “in alpha” be used as an antonym to “in beta,” or it’s a totally different animal?
Jun
6
answered Teaching vs Training
Jun
1
answered What do you call the segment of track between two train stops?
Jun
1
revised How would we classify the phrase “worn out?”
remove greeting
May
27
comment A correct word for 'learnful'
Response to edit 2: no, that actually sounds perfectly natural. People say things like that all the time.
May
26
comment Is a dark polka dot necktie dark?
I can't get past the nonsense about blue being a noun. It's unambiguously an adjective. "Dark" here is an adverb; adverbs modify either verbs or adjectives. See, for example, grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/adverbs.htm .