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comment Is “in” before “losing” correct in the following phrases?
The word you want is "losing", not "loosing".
Feb
2
comment What does “OP” mean, as in “massively OP version of force telekinesis”?
You should go ask this on the SF&F meta site.
Feb
2
comment Meaning of sentence
Out of context, it sounds like gibberish. There's a good chance it's gibberish even in context; sounds like a bit of overblown literary criticism.
Feb
2
comment What do you call the segment of track between two train stops?
Note: this answer made much more sense before someone inexplicably edited the word "segment" into the question title.
Jan
1
comment Is it proper to write “In improved contrast”
Native speaker here: it sounds totally wrong, and makes no sense.
Dec
31
answered Opposite of heat?
Dec
14
awarded  Good Question
Dec
9
comment “even more”, “even much more”, “many more”
Not really; in my opinion all of those are ambiguous and unclear.
Dec
9
comment “even more”, “even much more”, “many more”
Ah! Well as I said, the sentence was quite ambiguous. So what is wrong with what you just wrote in your comment? "parents teach us how to speak, how to interact in social situations, and many other things besides."
Dec
9
comment “But most importantly, your philosophy is what is the most appealing to me.” How do I avoid the repetition of “most”?
I am not the downvoter, but personally I don't like these options because they sound too emotional or personal for formal writing.
Dec
9
comment “Total” relates to “sum” as X relates to “product”
I don't think "total" is really a mathematical term. I think if a mathematician wants to make that distinction, s/he would use "sum" and "result".
Dec
9
answered “even more”, “even much more”, “many more”
Dec
8
comment Does anyone use both “whinge” and “whine?”
Downvoter, care to comment? Or, perhaps, whinge a bit about my question?
Dec
8
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
7
comment Adjective for not knowing any better
Naive, ignorant, innocent?
Dec
7
awarded  Scholar
Dec
7
accepted Does anyone use both “whinge” and “whine?”
Dec
7
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
7
comment Does anyone use both “whinge” and “whine?”
This is great stuff, thank you! It sounds as if the gap in AmE left by the absence of "whinging" is filled by colloquialisms like "belly-aching" and "bitching".
Dec
7
awarded  Student