206 reputation
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visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Dec 1 at 12:56
stack

Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
Jun
13
awarded  Yearling
Jan
17
comment Does there exist an online dictionary in reverse alphabetical order?
Good question +1. Suggestion: could you change your title to something like "Is there an online dictionary ordered by words spelled in reverse?"
Oct
11
comment What preposition should I use before the word “Christmas”?
You should complete your answer by noting that "at" and "on" are equivalent depending on British vs. American English.
Jul
25
comment Is this correct: “I'd have to have had…”
To me, "If I would have" is a problem. I would even stick my neck out and say it's incorrect.
Jul
13
answered Words to describe a semi-literate person
Jun
21
comment If Christopher is a “carrier of Christ” then what is Jennifer carrying?
Could you give a reference?
May
23
comment “Describe with” vs. “describe by”
Your example is good, but I don't think it's really a question of "with" vs. "by". Some verbs only take "with", some only "by", and some take both but the meaning changes. I won't bet on this, but I would say it's a matter of remembering every pair.
Apr
21
comment What are the origins of “what's up”?
Besides, Wiktionary doesn't claim that it began with Bugs Bunny.
Apr
18
comment “Nobody want to go there,” or “nobody wants to go there”?
If you added an example, like the one mentioned in Kosmonaut's answer, it would improve this answer. I'm saying this because I don't know the technical term you mentioned, although I do think it's useful that you provided it.
Apr
18
comment “Nobody want to go there,” or “nobody wants to go there”?
I don't think "any choice" and "any left" are good examples of singular usage. You can only say "Is there any left" for uncountable nouns, right? (Any sugar, any butter). As for "choice," which does have a plural form, I'm still not convinced... doesn't "choice" have both countable and uncountable forms, and aren't you using the uncountable here?... I'm just thinking out loud, but it seems to me that any should be usually used with the plural.
Apr
5
awarded  Supporter
Apr
5
answered “to complete X to Y” OR “into Y” OR both wrong
Apr
4
awarded  Teacher
Apr
4
answered “Wonder if won't”