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seen Jan 30 at 1:41

Jan
29
comment Why is “sorry” used for both apology and sympathy?
It seems to me they really have nothing to do with each other at all. That's quite remarkable. How about "I'm sorry that I was offensive" vs. "I'm sorry if anyone felt offended" -- apology vs. notpology. Both are about regrets; they differ only in taking responsibility.
Jan
28
comment Is there a non-sexual phrase for sleeping with someone?
My point is that there are an infinity of phrases for expressing this, and mine certainly isn't the best by any measure. "Platonicly share a bed with someone" is another.
Jan
28
comment Is there a non-sexual phrase for sleeping with someone?
"tends to only be used with some kind of need" -- the need is simply of shelter and sleep. "My house is tented so I crashed at Bob's place last night" doesn't imply any more than that. Of course, it also has nothing to do with sharing a bed, so this answer is just wrong.
Jan
28
comment Is there a non-sexual phrase for sleeping with someone?
" why would you do that?" Because you're both tired and there's only one bed, or there's no heat and not enough bedding. Because you're a couple who co-own the bed (yes, that's right, couples don't constantly have sex.) I'm sure an intelligent person with a decent imagination can come up with other reasons.
Jan
28
comment Is there a non-sexual phrase for sleeping with someone?
English is not just a collection of phrases, it's a language, with a grammar. "sleep with someone in the same bed without having sex" should do.
Apr
16
awarded  Yearling
Nov
9
comment I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?
@dainichi "such a norm makes a lot of sense" -- I never disputed that.
Nov
9
comment I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?
@NeilCoffey You analogy still isn't very good. There is a fact of the matter as to whether the theory of evolution or a big flood is a more adequate account of the development of species. There is no fact of the matter as to which of "than me" or "than I" is correct -- such correctness is normative, a matter of opinion, no matter what sort of sophistry people without hats wish to apply. "the exact date of Noah's flood" is somewhere in between; it would be an empirical question if there had been such a flood, but it's a matter of fact that there wasn't.
Nov
9
comment I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?
@dainichi "... I agree ... I completely disagree ... my book ... make sense to me ..." -- none of that is of the slightest interest to me.
Jul
31
awarded  Caucus
Jul
23
comment Please, don't - I'm not
@ColinFine You're going out of you way to miss and evade the point. Replace "grammar" with "usage". Sheesh. I will not engage you further.
Jul
23
comment Can you also say “Take you care” or “Take you care, too”?
"Don't be so sure" -- I am well advised to be sure that the question is not about "You take care". "my first sentence" -- I was not aware that MustafaJF was your sockpuppet. ""as should not have escaped your notice" -- what has not escaped my notice is that you are very confused.
Jul
23
comment What does “Has it come to this?” in “Republican leaders quickly voiced horror at these tactics. ‘Has it come to this?’ said John Boehner” mean?
"is perfectly find [sic], and so is guessing at the specifics" -- no, it isn't. "since there are clues in the sentance [sic]" -- the clues are not adequate to establish the validity of the guess.
Jul
23
comment What does “Has it come to this?” in “Republican leaders quickly voiced horror at these tactics. ‘Has it come to this?’ said John Boehner” mean?
"Although technically correct, generalizations aren't always the most helpful responses to questions that follow a template of "What does X mean in Y?". " -- It is here. Nice attempt at special pleading, though.
Jul
21
comment Can you also say “Take you care” or “Take you care, too”?
Please re-read the question. It's not about "You take care".
Jul
21
comment What does “Has it come to this?” in “Republican leaders quickly voiced horror at these tactics. ‘Has it come to this?’ said John Boehner” mean?
I assure you that I have no trouble remembering that. The point is that my statement is correct ... in response to your difficulty in thinking of what "it" represents. There is no point in being so specific -- if you were to ask Boehner whether he meant their desperation, he would gladly assent, but he would also do so for numerous other negative attributes. The fact is that "it" here doesn't mean "their desperation", it means "how things are".
Jul
21
comment Please, don't - I'm not
@ColinFine Such editing is perfectly reasonable if there is good reason to believe that the source of poor grammar is the author rather than the character.
Jul
21
comment What does “Has it come to this?” in “Republican leaders quickly voiced horror at these tactics. ‘Has it come to this?’ said John Boehner” mean?
"The Republicans either have to raise taxes for the wealthy" -- poor things. "The statement really speaks to the dirty hand that the Democrats are playing in that they have to either do it or the Democrats will force it to happen." -- that's quite a spin.
Jul
21
comment What does “Has it come to this?” in “Republican leaders quickly voiced horror at these tactics. ‘Has it come to this?’ said John Boehner” mean?
"it" refers generally to state of things, and specifically to that aspect of the state of things that the speaker is disturbed by.
Jul
21
comment What does “Has it come to this?” in “Republican leaders quickly voiced horror at these tactics. ‘Has it come to this?’ said John Boehner” mean?
@YoichiOishi That's not what he meant, and it's not a typo. He isn't asking how, he's asking whether. But he really isn't asking at all. the question is rhetorical.