317 reputation
1211
bio website
location Toronto, Canada
age 42
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Sep 26 at 15:46

Defining quotes:

"The present letter is a very long one, simply because I had no leisure to make it shorter."
— Blaise Pascal

"The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese."
—Steven Wright


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
12
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
31
awarded  Caucus
May
6
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
12
comment Is something half price or half priced?
Additionally you've used hyphens which I didn't think to do in my posting.
Apr
12
asked Is something half price or half priced?
Feb
5
asked “Effect a friend” in advertising?
Jan
28
comment Am I misusing the semicolon?
@Cerberus , I sought out some instances of ?: (aka Elvis text emoticon by the hair lick) using the Symbol Hound search engine advanced mode for phrase "you?:" symbolhound.com/?q=&l=&e=you%3F%3A&n=&u= It doesn't appear to be only older print.
Jan
28
asked Term to describe users' initial dislike of user interface change
Jan
26
comment Why “step into a car” but “step onto a plane”
Indeed @choster, definitely use caution when choosing between into or onto to describe the horse.
Nov
23
comment Can “thanks in advance” be considered rude?
The acronymn TIA is less awesome because you devote the least amount of time possible while setting up expectation other people should spend time on you. Even the full words in their brevity can come off badly in the same manner. Not unusual in the tech world (i.e. online forums) where users are often less apt to consider standard business formality.
Aug
19
awarded  Yearling
Jul
31
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
17
accepted What are the origins of: to “bleed something”?
Jul
12
comment “I'll see you” is the same as “I'll miss you”?
And then there are ultimate parting phrases that convey dislike like "I'll see you in hell". Usually one or the other person is dying when something like this is uttered. The speaker is often either stating that his dislike of the other person transcends all time and space, or he's acknowledging wrongdoings of his own in an unrepentant manner.
Jul
11
awarded  Commentator
Jul
11
comment What are the origins of: to “bleed something”?
Okay, so right now it appears to be a battle to the references between Feral Oink and Ham and Bacon.
Jul
11
asked What are the origins of: to “bleed something”?
May
24
comment Who, what, where, when, why, how. Why so many “Wh”s?
@nohat: What site is this question more appropriate for? Can it be moved to where it will be most helpful in context?