Reputation
1,358
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
6 19 37
Impact
~499k people reached

16h
revised Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
added 13 characters in body
17h
comment Negative-connotation word for someone who is straight-edge?
Huey Lewis may disagree ;) youtube.com/watch?v=LB5YkmjalDg
17h
comment Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
@Mari-LouA I think it's perfectly clear that I'm not looking for a word to describe an "excessive display of sentimentality".
17h
revised Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
added 358 characters in body
17h
comment Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
@Mari-LouA I'm glad you accept that your first comment is not constructive. Your second comment makes more sense, but it still assumes the worst, instead of trying to understand my aim: I did not single out mawkish to be "unfair" to Josh61. My original question made it clear that I was referring to sincere expressions of emotion -- not exaggerated or overly sentimental displays. Unfortunately that got lost by most who read it, so I went back to clarify things. I was not being "unfair" to anybody.
17h
comment Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
@Mari-LouA Re: Mawkish. Am I supposed to list every variation? I've flagged your comments to the moderators. I hope they can understand why your comments are merely argumentative and add nothing to the discussion at hand.
17h
comment Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
@Mari-LouA Sometimes I feel like you bounce around threads looking for ways to start arguments or upset people. "Sharing your innermost" is a perfectly acceptable phrase, especially in the given context.
17h
revised Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
deleted 14 characters in body
1d
revised Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
added 13 characters in body
1d
revised Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
added 18 characters in body
1d
awarded  Nice Question
2d
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
5
asked Is there a negative word for an overt display of emotion?
Jan
27
comment What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?
I'm still confused, sorry. As Werner said: Are you referring to: 1. The process of grieving. 2. The result of grief (acceptance/coming to terms). 3. Both (the whole process)? Thanks.
Jan
27
comment What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?
It's not clear at all. It sounds very much like he's talking about the entire process, from start to finish -- from news to acceptance. Even when clarifying himself that's what he appears to be saying. ("It generally ends when your"accept" the loss.")
Jan
27
comment What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?
@Mari-LouA I think I understand you. You wrote "the person in mourning" but you meant "the bereaved person". (The two are very different.) Gotcha.
Jan
27
comment What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?
@Mari-LouA You wrote: "I believe the OP is referring to the period when the person in mourning" And then: "The person is no longer suffering from shock, i.e. they aren't mourning" ?
Jan
27
comment What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?
@Mari-LouA Mourning is very different from acceptance. You don't stay in mourning for the rest of your life after someone close to you dies.
Jan
26
comment What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?
Can you clarify what you mean by "elaborated"? It sounds like you're asking for the entire process -- including the part where the grief is explored and expanded.
Jan
26
comment What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?
@QPaysTaxes This is an utterly pointless discussion. If you want to ignore my point ("cherry pick" what I said), so be it. It's clear I take the OP to mean the entire process, not just the end.