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Apr
19
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
3
awarded  Curious
Mar
2
asked When to say “a proof”, “the proof” and just “proof”?
Feb
25
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
23
comment In what cases should I use a comma before “or”?
Thank you very nice response! :)
Feb
23
asked In what cases should I use a comma before “or”?
Feb
23
asked Should I use a comma between two sentence parts that have “you <verb>” in them?
Dec
19
awarded  Yearling
Nov
29
asked Can I say “time to hit it” meaning “time to go to sleep”?
Nov
25
awarded  Commentator
Nov
25
comment Can I say “thousands of <something>” to make it sound more dramatic when it's actually “a thousand and a half”?
Thanks, I edited the question to make it more general. Other examples include 1500 nails.
Nov
25
comment Can I say “thousands of <something>” to make it sound more dramatic when it's actually “a thousand and a half”?
I edited the question to make it more general.
Nov
25
revised Can I say “thousands of <something>” to make it sound more dramatic when it's actually “a thousand and a half”?
added 60 characters in body
Nov
25
comment Can I say “thousands of <something>” to make it sound more dramatic when it's actually “a thousand and a half”?
I edited the question to make it more general. Sorry.
Nov
25
comment Can I say “thousands of <something>” to make it sound more dramatic when it's actually “a thousand and a half”?
Yes right, they're not gonna see my pay check.
Nov
25
comment Can I say “thousands of <something>” to make it sound more dramatic when it's actually “a thousand and a half”?
Thanks. I don't want to lie but I want to make it more impressive. Would I be able to say "thousands of dollars" if it was 1) 1,999, 2) 2,000, 3) 2,001?
Nov
25
asked Can I say “thousands of <something>” to make it sound more dramatic when it's actually “a thousand and a half”?
Nov
8
accepted Using word “hate” in American English
Nov
8
accepted How to become more professional at spoken English?
Nov
8
accepted Which is correct and what's the difference: “Next time I'll need <something>, I'll …”, or “Next time I need <something>, I'll”?