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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 37 votes cast
Nov
4
comment Is there English proverb equivalent to Japanese and Korean one, “The ground becomes solid after a heavy rain”?
@Vality - that's true, though the various definitions of dawn are really interesting (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawn). I still maintain though, that the darkest part of the night (assuming no moon), must be midway between sunrise and sunset (though I guess that could also be both dawn and dusk given the right season and latitude). If we're saying that makes the phrase useful, though, we could equally say "The night is darkest just after dusk", which is just weird!
Nov
4
comment Is there English proverb equivalent to Japanese and Korean one, “The ground becomes solid after a heavy rain”?
A lull in conflict is more likely to be "In the eye of the storm", no?
Nov
3
comment Is there English proverb equivalent to Japanese and Korean one, “The ground becomes solid after a heavy rain”?
I've only ever heard before the storm, never after the storm... the expression means "be wary when it's calm, because it won't stay calm for long".
Nov
3
comment Is there English proverb equivalent to Japanese and Korean one, “The ground becomes solid after a heavy rain”?
@Mari-LouA - I do get it, but I think it's just a failed metaphor: it doesn't help understand the underlying meaning of "Things will get better just when you think they can't get any worse", because when you think of the night just before the dawn, it's clearly not the darkest bit. Imagine if the saying was "The ocean is deepest nearest the beach"...
Nov
3
comment Is there English proverb equivalent to Japanese and Korean one, “The ground becomes solid after a heavy rain”?
I've always disliked this phrase, just cause it's so obviously untrue! It's darkest in the middle of the night, and gets progressively lighter until the dawn...
Dec
17
awarded  Yearling
Nov
3
comment Is there a word for a professional who has a beautiful and neat handwriting and whose work consists of using that attribute?
The person who draws the text in comic books is called the 'Letterer' (imaginatively enough!).
May
4
comment Wondering if the use of the word “gotta” is correct here
Good call, you're right. Adjusted to make that clearer,.
May
4
revised Wondering if the use of the word “gotta” is correct here
Adjusted phrasing to separate the paraphrased bits
May
3
answered Reaction to Scratching Noise
May
3
answered Wondering if the use of the word “gotta” is correct here
Mar
12
answered One word for “proactive changing of behaviour”
Mar
12
comment One word for “proactive changing of behaviour”
I think 'evolution' is pretty strictly a reactive process.
Mar
11
comment What's the English equivalent of “Drilling one's head”?
Australian slang also allows for "pissing in my ear" - which is the same thing, but when it's annoying for the listener (as well as being a fun phrase).
Mar
11
answered Is it ok to say “Don't visit the internet”?
Feb
3
comment What's a man called who follows everything his wife says or wishes?
@user21497 - given that there are something like 180 million Hindi speakers in the world, I don't think we need to use a the (horrible) actions of a tiny minority to evaluate an entire language, no. Uxorious carries an implication of excessive - it is inherently a submissive concept. Contrast to devoted, which is generally positive because it doesn't mean excessive.
Feb
3
awarded  Critic
Jan
15
comment What do you call the thing you get at the hospital when you break your leg, etc.?
@tchrist, your nationality is showing!
Dec
27
comment What's the origin of “dinkum”?
+1 for the 'work' meaning being obsolete: These days, 'Dinkum' is used as a contraction of 'Fair Dinkum', to mean 'truthfully', particularly when spoken. For example: "You won't believe it, Barry's been rooting my missus!" to which Bruce might respond "Dinkum?" - equivalent to 'Really?' or 'You're kidding'.
Dec
27
comment Is “coachee” even a word?
'...ee' is usually paired with an '..er', isn't it? Employee/Employer, Trainee/Trainer. I wouldn't use Coachee because to me, it implies you're a Coacher, not a Coach.