231 reputation
6
bio website benhull.info
location South Australia, Australia
age 33
visits member for 11 months
seen Nov 17 at 5:10
Mostly front-end web stuff: CSS, HTML, JS.

Nov
3
comment Is there a word for a professional who has a beautiful and neat handwriting and whose work consists of using that attribute?
The person who draws the text in comic books is called the 'Letterer' (imaginatively enough!).
May
4
comment Wondering if the use of the word “gotta” is correct here
Good call, you're right. Adjusted to make that clearer,.
May
4
revised Wondering if the use of the word “gotta” is correct here
Adjusted phrasing to separate the paraphrased bits
May
3
answered Reaction to Scratching Noise
May
3
answered Wondering if the use of the word “gotta” is correct here
Mar
12
answered One word for “proactive changing of behaviour”
Mar
12
comment One word for “proactive changing of behaviour”
I think 'evolution' is pretty strictly a reactive process.
Mar
11
comment What's the English equivalent of “Drilling one's head”?
Australian slang also allows for "pissing in my ear" - which is the same thing, but when it's annoying for the listener (as well as being a fun phrase).
Mar
11
answered Is it ok to say “Don't visit the internet”?
Feb
3
comment What's a man called who follows everything his wife says or wishes?
@user21497 - given that there are something like 180 million Hindi speakers in the world, I don't think we need to use a the (horrible) actions of a tiny minority to evaluate an entire language, no. Uxorious carries an implication of excessive - it is inherently a submissive concept. Contrast to devoted, which is generally positive because it doesn't mean excessive.
Feb
3
awarded  Critic
Jan
15
comment What do you call the thing you get at the hospital when you break your leg, etc.?
@tchrist, your nationality is showing!
Dec
27
comment What's the origin of “dinkum”?
+1 for the 'work' meaning being obsolete: These days, 'Dinkum' is used as a contraction of 'Fair Dinkum', to mean 'truthfully', particularly when spoken. For example: "You won't believe it, Barry's been rooting my missus!" to which Bruce might respond "Dinkum?" - equivalent to 'Really?' or 'You're kidding'.
Dec
27
comment Is “coachee” even a word?
'...ee' is usually paired with an '..er', isn't it? Employee/Employer, Trainee/Trainer. I wouldn't use Coachee because to me, it implies you're a Coacher, not a Coach.
Dec
27
answered “Not even I can” versus “Even I can't”
Dec
27
comment Is there a word for “air can pass through it”?
Yep - @DavidM's got it. Porosity is an indicator how much capacity/free space there is in the material (how big the pores are, and what shape), and permeability is an indicator of how easily fluids can flow through the material.
Dec
27
awarded  Commentator
Dec
27
comment Word for large, short, wide, roundish, fat bottle
Australia uses 'stubbies' vs. 'long-necks' about beer bottles, too, though stubbies are usually ≈375ml, and long-necks 750ml. Then there's the infamous 'Darwin Stubby' - which is 2L or so: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Darwin_stubby.jpg
Dec
27
comment Is there a word for “air can pass through it”?
I'd say that common usage for 'Aerated' implies 'containing air', particularly of liquids: Aerated water is bubbly (even though that's actually carbonation with CO2, not air), and aerated cement has bubbles formed in it while liquid. I wouldn't use aerated about fabric, though.
Dec
27
comment Is there a word for “air can pass through it”?
Porous is related to permeable, but it's distinct - Porous means 'containing pores', but doesn't specify that the pores be interconnected such that liquid or air can move from one pore to the next. So, a material like fabric can both porous and permeable, while something like polystyrene is porous but not permeable (to water, at least). Like others have said, permeability is fluid-specific (water vs. air), but porosity is not (either it has pores or it doesn't).