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location Victoria, Canada
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visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Aug 17 '12 at 21:12

Aug
17
awarded  Yearling
Mar
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
30
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
19
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
23
awarded  Famous Question
Aug
17
awarded  Yearling
Jan
14
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
17
awarded  Yearling
Jul
16
comment Does “renege” have any racial overtones, or is it otherwise offensive?
Ask him what the forklift he thinks it means, and how is that racist...
Apr
27
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
8
comment What is a good term for someone who refuses to debate an issue ab initio?
I think JR has completely misunderstood the question. Not "refuses to debate 'out of first principle,'" but "refuses to debate FROM first principles". The key being understanding the meaning of "first principles". Not why the person won't debate, but rather, from what point in the chain of logic they are willing to start the debate, and what assumptions they bring into it.
Feb
21
comment How should I understand “She cracked open a door”?
Ah, yes. Before I read the context - "Marie Curie" - I was thinking "Barbarian Princess with large axe."
Feb
15
answered Cell phone? Cell? Mobile phone? What's the “correct” term?
Feb
15
comment What's the term for siblings born 1+ years apart on the same day?
Discussion on meta notwithstanding, all words were at one time "made up". If this is not the place to do so, that doesn't mean you shouldn't feel free elsewhere.
Feb
8
comment Where does “pull it off” come from?
By didn't answer the question, I meant that although it shows a lot of early usage, and perhaps the earliest, it does not show how that phrase came to mean what it does. How does/did "pulling" evolve into "winning"? We all know what it means, what we don't know is how it came to mean that.
Feb
6
comment Where does “pull it off” come from?
Great research, but doesn't answer the question.
Feb
1
comment What is a good, short, word to describe a software engineer?
"Geek" is about as short as you're liable to get.
Jan
26
comment Meaning of “patronage” in the 1700s
My reading of history is that this was the modus operandi of the British government in the 1700's and probably well beyond, and is taken for granted as simply "the way things are" in many parts of the world today.
Jan
26
comment Is it awkward to use the word “aubergine” instead of “eggplant”?
This also touches on the "marketing appeal" issue - "squid" (yuk!)vs. "calamari" (num!).