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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 125 votes cast
Dec
16
awarded  Scholar
Dec
16
accepted passive with “to get”
Dec
15
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
11
awarded  Yearling
Dec
2
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
9
comment What is the “fundamental” difference between ‘search’ and ‘seek’?
@michael_timofeev it is still used a lot in the written language, but not in the spoken language, as I should have clarified.
Nov
6
answered What is the “fundamental” difference between ‘search’ and ‘seek’?
Oct
26
answered Does “Bad Ass!” have a positive or negative meaning?
Apr
23
answered Is it alright to use lowercase “i” or should you always use “I” (uppercase)?
Dec
20
comment Why did English change so much between Chaucer and Shakespeare?
A nice answer to a related question on linguistics.stackexchange: linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/1254/…
Dec
11
awarded  Yearling
Oct
2
comment Why is the 't' in 'nextdoor neighbour' usually silent? Where's the 't' in 'postman' gone? And why do people say 'guess book' for 'guest book'?
That is nice -- but maybe a linguist could do it better. Hopefully someone will come along and type it out clearly!
Oct
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
27
comment Why is the 't' in 'nextdoor neighbour' usually silent? Where's the 't' in 'postman' gone? And why do people say 'guess book' for 'guest book'?
I think not, because the glottalizing is "off" in those contexts. Hmm.... should think harder.
Sep
27
answered Why is the 't' in 'nextdoor neighbour' usually silent? Where's the 't' in 'postman' gone? And why do people say 'guess book' for 'guest book'?
Sep
8
comment Which is correct: 'as beautiful as her' or 'as beautiful as she'?
I suspect this "rule," like many, was invented by 17th-18th century grammarians, concerned that English did not appear like Latin.
Sep
8
comment Which is correct: 'as beautiful as her' or 'as beautiful as she'?
I would go so far as to say that the prescriptively correct "as she" does not occur in the natural speech of any native English speaker.
Jul
30
comment Palatalization of “t” followed by “y”
are you referring specifically to British English? In American English the final /t/ in that is glotallized, so we don't get palatalization across the word boundary.
Jul
29
comment How often do people say “gotta”, “wanna” or “gonna” in English speaking countries?
A data point which is famous in generative linguistics but is valid regardless of your stance on such theories. "This is the picture that I wanna hang on the wall" is descriptively grammatical, but "This is the candidate that I wanna win the election" is not, you must say "want to." (In my analaysis this is because the modal "wanna" must be the subject of the following verb as with the older modals should/must/etc. In the generative analysis it's because there's an invisible "trace" of the subject "president" before the "to" that got moved but still blocks phonetic assimilation.)
Jul
29
answered How often do people say “gotta”, “wanna” or “gonna” in English speaking countries?