455 reputation
19
bio website
location
age
visits member for 9 months
seen Sep 14 at 13:34

Sep
8
comment Which is correct: 'as beautiful as her' or 'as beautiful as she'?
I suspect this "rule," like many, was invented by 17th-18th century grammarians, concerned that English did not appear like Latin.
Sep
8
comment Which is correct: 'as beautiful as her' or 'as beautiful as she'?
I would go so far as to say that the prescriptively correct "as she" does not occur in the natural speech of any native English speaker.
Jul
30
comment Palatalization of “t” followed by “y”
are you referring specifically to British English? In American English the final /t/ in that is glotallized, so we don't get palatalization across the word boundary.
Jul
29
comment How often do people say “gotta”, “wanna” or “gonna” in English speaking countries?
A data point which is famous in generative linguistics but is valid regardless of your stance on such theories. "This is the picture that I wanna hang on the wall" is descriptively grammatical, but "This is the candidate that I wanna win the election" is not, you must say "want to." (In my analaysis this is because the modal "wanna" must be the subject of the following verb as with the older modals should/must/etc. In the generative analysis it's because there's an invisible "trace" of the subject "president" before the "to" that got moved but still blocks phonetic assimilation.)
Jul
29
answered How often do people say “gotta”, “wanna” or “gonna” in English speaking countries?
Jul
25
awarded  Curious
Jul
24
comment spread of the quotative “be like” outside North America
@EdwinAshworth interesting paper! I suspect that the rapid spread of the form (as opposed to other Americanisms) has to do with its utility for precisely this function.
Jul
24
awarded  Editor
Jul
24
comment spread of the quotative “be like” outside North America
I added a reference with examples for those who haven't heard of it.
Jul
24
revised spread of the quotative “be like” outside North America
added reference
Jul
24
asked spread of the quotative “be like” outside North America
Jun
23
comment Can a hypothetical “could” main clause stand on its own without an expressed conditional?
This is a fantastically sourced question -- thanks! I cannot post an answer because I do not know the rule, but both the house and clock-repair sentences work with both "can" and "could." For the house sentence, I can think of no difference whatsoever in meaning. For the "clock-repair" sentence, I think the sentence with "could" is just a little more hypothetical -- with a little more of an implication that I am searching for anyone at all who could even try to fix the watch. But it's subtle.
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Jun
16
awarded  Caucus
Jun
11
answered A 'polite' way to say that someone is fat
May
8
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
17
answered When in connected speech do we read 'r' after the end of a sentence or a passage?
Mar
15
comment British upper-class pronunciation of words like “what” and “when”
as for Britain, the wikipedia suggests that any w/wh distinction is an affectation as well
Mar
15
comment British upper-class pronunciation of words like “what” and “when”
@JanusBahsJacquet yes, sorry, my answer was not so well-written. I just wanted to clarify that, at least in the US, some speakers very deliberately add a /h/ before /w/ in formal speech, but almost none of these speakers have this as a feature of the native dialect. I imagine the number of "wh-affectors" (who tend to make /hw/) outweighs the number of "born wh-ers;" (among whom I have only ever heard /ʍ/); that's what I was trying to communicate to OP with this answer, not that there is a phonemic distinction between the two sounds.
Mar
15
awarded  Critic