322 reputation
7
bio website
location Where English comes from. England in the United Kingdom (UK).
age
visits member for 9 months
seen Aug 19 at 20:53

Aug
19
comment What’s so funny about “You are winner”?
Artyom Kolichenkov, “you are winner” seems like something that Borat would say. So does "I am student".
Aug
19
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
Mark, that's weird and must be new.
Aug
18
comment Is there a term for the stereotypical Japanese ghost girl with a white dress and long black hair that mostly covers her face?
Yōkai isn't well known everywhere.
Aug
18
comment what does “ Plant Your arse” mean?
Kristina Lopez, yes. Arse is the word in the UK.
Aug
17
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
Mr. Shiny and New 安宇, "I could care less" might be in normal speech in the USA but, it's definitely not in England and the rest of the UK.
Aug
17
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
5arx, yes. It is.
Aug
17
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
Your analysis is correct. Were the people who said "could care less" Americans?
Aug
17
comment Pronunciation of “of”
Tsuyoshi Ito, that is a surprise. Maybe because it's not a “rule” but a variation in how different people pronounce that particular, letter f. It's always amusing to learn of things in the language that non-native speakers have assumed or have been led to believe are strict rules, followed religiously, when in reality, they are not.
Aug
14
comment Difference between “college” and “university”
outis nihil, no. In the UK, the word college is often used as a synonym for sixth form. Secondary schools are just called secondary schools. You would benefit from reading the definitions at this link dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/college_1?q=college
Aug
14
comment How to write the date of an event that lasts a few days [American / British English]
mirx, your first example is more likely in American English.
Aug
14
answered How to write the date of an event that lasts a few days [American / British English]
Aug
14
comment “no hell” or “no hang”?
I agree. It's not common.
Aug
14
comment Legitimacy of the usage of “homeworks”
Josh61, I never heard it used at all in the multiple schools that I went to, in the UK. That was also the case with people that I knew at other schools. In my day, homework was just called homework. It was as simple as that.
Aug
14
comment What are “schlieren” in English?
what, if that word has entered English, it's certainly not common. This is the first that I've heard of it.
Aug
14
comment What do we call the GUI “box” which groups elements together?
Pacerier, the "how do we call" wording is incorrect in English. You should replace the how with what. You would benefit from reading the discussion at this link english.stackexchange.com/questions/150325/…
Aug
11
comment University vs college vs academy vs institute vs community college
That's better now.
Aug
11
comment What does it mean when someone says he is from the “Class of 2001”?
No, in the UK, people don't normally say "class of" followed by a year. That seems to be just a North American thing.
Aug
11
comment Does “exotic” have racist connotation?
This seems to be opinion-based. There may be some people who would consider it in a racial way but, there are many who do not. It depends on the personal opinions of individual people. Generally, people don't consider it to be racist.
Aug
11
comment University vs college vs academy vs institute vs community college
3-Laws-Safe, your answer would be improved if you mention where in the world your definitions apply. They don't in the UK.
Aug
11
comment Legitimacy of the usage of “homeworks”
Josh61, your answer would be improved if you mention where in the world the word assignment, is used in this context. I have not heard it used in the UK.