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"There is nothing as eloquent as a rattlesnake's tail." (Native American proverb, Navajo)

Quidquid Latine dictum sit altum videtur. ("Whatever is said in Latin sounds profound.")


3h
comment Selected books of K12 education in US
This question is OT here, so it will be closed. However, here is a standard HS reading list in the US. I've read almost every book on the list, and I can attest to their value. Can't get more specific than that here.
14h
comment Can “it” be used with plural subject?
"...for it is many months since I have considered her as one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance." (Mr. Darcy) "It is several years since...", etc.
15h
reviewed Reviewed Pure verbal nouns/deverbal nouns vs. gerunds
15h
comment Pure verbal nouns/deverbal nouns vs. gerunds
Hi ducklucky1, and welcome to ELU. This doesn't really address the OP's question; it's more of a comment (which you can post when you have a bit more rep. Please do take a few minutes to take the site tour and visit the [help center (english.stackexchange.com/help) for guidance on how to use this site.
15h
awarded  Outspoken
15h
comment A one-off action or a series of actions in the past?
That's correct.
16h
comment Has “as-is” plural form?
possible duplicate of How should I pluralise “as is”?
16h
comment A one-off action or a series of actions in the past?
Yes, that sounds like a one time action followed by another.
16h
reviewed Reviewed Speaking with a forked tongue
16h
reviewed Reviewed “Subtotal” vs “total”
16h
comment A one-off action or a series of actions in the past?
I think you might be starting with a faulty premise here. "When Jack did all the shopping, he went to the cafe." sounds to me like he did his shopping at the cafe, which makes no sense (I'm AmE).
20h
answered Stand-alone Use of 'There' in English
21h
revised Stand-alone Use of 'There' in English
title, tag and body edit
21h
revised Use of “off/off of” in speech
title, tag and body edit
21h
comment Use of “off/off of” in speech
How do you say it? Some Americans say Get off me, some say get off of me (this would be particularly appropriate in written English), some say get (the @#$%) off. You might be interested in ELL, our sister site, which is a good site for basic English questions.
22h
comment “If you get lonely, I hope you phone me” vs. “will phone me”
I hope you know that you can call me any time sounds perfectly normal to me. I agree, though, that the best is your last example.
1d
comment Meaning and origin of “put a wrinkle on one's horn”
@SvenYargs - priceless! Thanks. ')
1d
comment “I would give you all the help you needed” vs. “would need” vs. “need”
There is something about the subjunctive, If you were, I would... that calls for needed, though I am not the linguist to answer why. It doesn't work for me to repeat would need and need (a bare infinitive or a second person singular present tense) doesn't sound right to me either. If you were..., I would give you all you needed (of whatever) is the only option that *sounds correct to me. :/
1d
comment “I would give you all the help you needed” vs. “would need” vs. “need”
possible duplicate of Different conditional clauses — "if you saw", "if you were to see", "if you had seen"
1d
revised “I would give you all the help you needed” vs. “would need” vs. “need”
edited tags