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1h
comment What does “they were taken for being taken in” mean?
@Jand - Please note that they were taken for (/as) taken in, not simply "taken in", which would mean "deceived". The later lines, "Why do you stand?” they were asked, and “Why do you walk?" and their response: "Because of the children..." indicates (to me) that both the continued standing and walking were both acts of conscience. If you do not understand the double "taken", I think you're missing the meaning of the line (and the answer above.)
1h
comment What did Samuel Johnson mean when he wrote this?
Hi and welcome. While this interprets the line correctly, the OP is wondering at the meaning of the word but, which your answer doesn't address (I am not the down voter, just explaining the probable reason this might be flagged as "not an answer".) The site tour and the help center provides some valuable guidance on this site. Again, welcome.
1h
revised What did Samuel Johnson mean when he wrote this?
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revised What does “they were taken for being taken in” mean?
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1h
comment What does “they were taken for being taken in” mean?
That's it, I believe as well. In the context of the poem, because "they stood and stood" (didn't abandon the 'cause'), they were taken for fools (or being fooled).
1h
revised What does “they were taken for being taken in” mean?
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2h
revised What does “they were taken for being taken in” mean?
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8h
comment Should amazing grace be am or I'm
@Jean - You may have just shot yourself in the foot...
8h
comment Should amazing grace be am or I'm
@tchrist - The user might think that because they are learning English as a second language and haven't gotten far enough along to know that intuitively. Just a guess, though.
8h
comment Should amazing grace be am or I'm
@Jean - Yes, both are correct, just as the next line "Was blind, but now I see," shares the same subject, I.
13h
awarded  Nice Answer
22h
comment The best words for a person who does not accept reality?
Why don't they accept reality? Is it out of optimism, lack of wisdom/misconstruction, biases or other? Context matters. Otherwise delusion might be the most general and appropriate term.
2d
comment Figures of Speech: Inversion, doubt
@Silenus - I think you're making the mistake of confusing a prepositional phrase with a sentence. As I said, the main clause has no inversion. As BillJ states (I believe quite correctly), the prepositional phrase is preposing the verb of the main clause.
2d
comment Figures of Speech: Inversion, doubt
@BillJ - That sounds like a good answer.
2d
comment Figures of Speech: Inversion, doubt
@Cerberus - Given the context (or lack of), we don't know, but it's a familiar adverbial phrase, whose meaning does change if so rearranged. Fixing an inversion shouldn't dramatically change the meaning of a sentence. "In every town I've visited" is not equivalent to "I've visited every town...". It seems the correction (not that it's needed) would be, "I've seen children playing in the street in every town I've visited."
2d
comment Figures of Speech: Inversion, doubt
@Silenus - That would change the meaning of the sentence entirely. They have not been in almost every house (that would be impossible.) The inversion, if there is any, is the second phrase with the first: "We've watched them gaping at the screen in almost every house we've been."
Apr
29
comment Is the sentence “I wonder where he's?” grammatically correct?
"Wherever the place, whatever the time// Every lane moves but the one where I’m."
Apr
25
revised Word or expression for guys who slept with the same woman(prostitute)?
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Apr
25
revised Surprisingly happy
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Apr
24
revised Surprisingly happy
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