1,819 reputation
918
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 16 hours ago

American English speaker (dialect, essentially General American) with British English traces from childhood.


Aug
14
comment Pronunciation of the English alphabet
@trlkly: Yes, [β] is much like [v], but why [w] -> [β]?
Aug
3
comment Is there a word to describe a highly desirable cursed treasure?
@Beta: That's it!
Jul
25
comment A word or phrase for 'Holy grail' (a goal impossible to achieve)
I think this is the best answer, aside from "Holy Grail" itself.
Jul
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
22
comment What does “up she rises” mean in the sea shanty “Drunken Sailor”?
The only original recording of this song that I'm aware of pronounces it "early" not "earl-aye"; the latter seems to be a modern innovation.
Jun
18
comment What's a word for a person who loves old or ancient things?
Antiquarian seems better than the alternatives, notwithstanding your objection.
Apr
22
comment Single word meaning “pregnant woman”
In the US it would be "mother-to-be".
Apr
22
comment One has to cook himself or themself?
@Mitch: I agree with everything you said (and had already upvoted Neil's comment above to that effect). I was just pointing out that essentially the same ambiguity exists with "for" and "by".
Apr
22
comment usage of i.e in a sentence
+1 for "I've never seen his preferred style elsewhere".
Apr
22
comment One has to cook himself or themself?
@Mitch: Clearly the reverse: you haven't ruled out the possibility of two people cooking food for just one of them.
Apr
19
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
1
comment “We strongly advise you to enjoy this book before turning to the Introduction”
@TimLymington: I interpret "enjoy" as I would "be well": a wish that things go well for you, rather than a prediction of the future or a command, even if they are grammatical imperatives.
Mar
13
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
9
awarded  Yearling
Feb
28
comment What would you call a person from India?
I'm not one of the downvoters, but I imagine their reason is that the term "Bharat" is not widely known outside of India.
Jan
30
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
11
comment “To make terse” (an insufficiently prolix title)
@AndrewLeach: No, the only text which was (apparently) insufficiently prolix was the title.
Nov
9
answered Can I use the word “precipice” to mean “cutting edge”?
Nov
9
answered Word to mean “then-current”