Reputation
1,140
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
2 12 31
Impact
~114k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 31 votes cast
4h
answered In sentences with “too” and “enough” what word does the to-infinitive modify?
1d
comment How common is the use of 'although' as a preposition rather than a conjunction?
@EdwinAshworth: how do you distinguish between a word that can only be a preposition, as is 'without' in 'without waiting for an answer', and 'before' in 'before leaving' / 'before he left', where it can be either? or both?!
1d
revised How common is the use of 'although' as a preposition rather than a conjunction?
added 124 characters in body
2d
answered How common is the use of 'although' as a preposition rather than a conjunction?
2d
asked How common is the use of 'although' as a preposition rather than a conjunction?
Jan
26
comment What's an antonym of demonize (other than deify)?
@Rathony: I like your 'idolise/idolize' in that it suggests the idea of 'false gods', 'idols', as opposed to the true God. As with 'demonise/demonize' there is the implied notion that it is ethically questionable to do so.
Jan
26
comment “[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”
@Born2Smile: I feel that all three of your example sentences deal with the same situation, that is 'a thing is like something in another field': the 'field' in the first case being another language rather than another species of animals, and your third example sentence means 'There is a phrase "broyer du noir", what is the equivalent for/to/of this phrase in English'!
Jan
26
comment “[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”
Since 'equivalent' means 'having the same worth as', the idea is that you can 'exchange one thing for another'… so, without any context, the preposition 'for' is the one that makes most sense, even if it is not the one that is used most.
Jan
26
comment What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?
@Josh61: sorry! I should have noticed. Other verbs, not nouns, that come to mind (apart from 'come to terms with' which I have just up-voted) are 'digest' and 'stomach', in keeping with the idea that the process can 'vary from person to person'.
Jan
26
comment What is the expression for the process of getting over the loss of a loved person?
A common phrasal verb that would fit the meaning is 'to get over sth', but I would not know how to turn it into a noun or noun phrase…
Jan
20
answered Born to do something or born for doing something / Made for doing something or to do something
Jan
19
comment The film [that/which] I selected for viewing
@SAH: No, I don't. I mean 'The Handbook of English Linguistics' from which I quote in my edited answer. Answer with sources, this time. This book is too difficult for non-specialists, like me. You've got to struggle with it.
Jan
19
revised The film [that/which] I selected for viewing
added 3 characters in body
Jan
19
comment The film [that/which] I selected for viewing
@SAH: this unwieldy book I bought thanks (or due?!) to Stack Exchange, as someone quoted from it and it sounded interesting, and definitive!
Jan
19
revised The film [that/which] I selected for viewing
references (painstakingly) added
Jan
19
revised The film [that/which] I selected for viewing
added: 'that' and 'zero pronoun' possible only in defining relative clauses and if the pronoun is not the subject of the verb in the relative clause
Jan
19
comment The film [that/which] I selected for viewing
@SAH: there is not any! This is what I would call 'grey grammar' (I mean a phrase like 'the film which I told you about the other day' is not wrong but it is not quite right either; it is not one a native speaker of English is very likely to produce, isn't it?) And the grammar books I use (my favourite, as a foreigner, being Michael Swan's 'Practical English Usage') do not say anything about this idea of consistency of register between words and structures. I just thought that it made sense.
Jan
17
revised Feed out the rope
original poster's sentence further explained
Jan
17
answered Feed out the rope
Jan
17
revised The film [that/which] I selected for viewing
inverted commas removed in the example phrases