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10h
comment A figure of speech to illustrate the irreversibility of an action
That's the first thing that came to my mind, Humpty Dumpty. Isn't the usual way of alluding to this nursery rhyme "All the king's horses and all the king's men…" with that (to the foreigner who would not know what the phrase refers to) annoying habit of leaving the sentence unfinished? An insider code to make others understand that if they are not English born and bread, they are… well, helpless!
21h
comment A figure of speech to illustrate the irreversibility of an action
are all these sayings 'figures of speech'?
2d
comment Do “it is time for someone to do something” and “it is time someone did something” mean the same thing?
It is NOT an exact duplicate, not even a remote duplicate! The question asks about the difference between 'it is time + infinitive' and 'it is (high) time + past subjunctive'. The question you refer me back to is about 'it is time + present indicative' and 'it is (high) time + past subjunctive', conjugated verb forms both.
2d
revised Do “it is time for someone to do something” and “it is time someone did something” mean the same thing?
edited body
Apr
27
comment Doing A is preferable to doing B. = Doing A rather than doing (?) / do (?) B is advisable
something that obscures the issue of this rule is a sentence like: 'It is advisable to do A rather than do B.' , where 'do' is in the full infinitive first and in the bare infinitive next (because 'to' is not repeated, is understood, isn't it)?!
Apr
27
asked Doing A is preferable to doing B. = Doing A rather than doing (?) / do (?) B is advisable
Apr
12
comment Does the use of 'piece' instead of 'coin' depend on the value of the coin?
@Mari-LouA: got it! … at last!
Apr
12
comment Does the use of 'piece' instead of 'coin' depend on the value of the coin?
@Mari-LouA: with a hyphen it does, 'one-pound piece' or 'a one-pound piece, which is logical since the determiner/quantifier plus noun work as a kind of compound adjective.
Apr
12
comment Does the use of 'piece' instead of 'coin' depend on the value of the coin?
@Mari-Lou A: thank you for your excellent edit. Funny, I could not add 'a one-pound piece' on your link, but I was able to ngram-viewer 'a one-pound coin' and 'a one-pound piece'.
Apr
12
awarded  Inquisitive
Apr
11
accepted Does the use of 'piece' instead of 'coin' depend on the value of the coin?
Apr
11
comment Does the use of 'piece' instead of 'coin' depend on the value of the coin?
@DanBron: sorry I made a mistake in the question, I meant 'a fifty-pence piece', not 'bit', and that's what I had ngram-viewered.
Apr
11
revised Does the use of 'piece' instead of 'coin' depend on the value of the coin?
corrected a mistake: not 'bit' but 'piece'
Apr
11
asked Does the use of 'piece' instead of 'coin' depend on the value of the coin?
Apr
9
comment What does the word 'candle-skin' mean?
I imagined dipping your fingertip in molten candle wax, letting it solidify on your fingertip, and then taking it off to feel it, play with it because it is very smooth.
Apr
9
revised What does the word 'candle-skin' mean?
whole paragraph rather than just one sentence, for larger context
Apr
9
asked What does the word 'candle-skin' mean?
Apr
8
comment Why do we say “I would appreciate it if you paid in cash,” but not “I will appreciate it if you pay in cash”?
this is what Michael Swan (Practical English Usage) calls the 'distancing' use of tenses: think of sentences like 'I wonder whether you would lend me your car', 'I wondered whether you would lend me your car', 'I was wondering whether you would lend me your car'; not just tense (a past instead of a present) but also aspect (continuous or progressive, instead of simple) can be used to make the listener feel free to refuse, showing consideration, which heightens the chances of him or her agreeing to do what we want!
Apr
7
comment Idiom request for wasting time or money
@SvenYargs: I checked and this meaning is archaic in English. Still common in French, though.
Apr
7
comment A word to describe someone constantly seeking bewilderment
How about 'a star-gazer' and 'star-gazing'? Star-gazer is the name of a tent model by Marmot, mostly mesh so that you can really sleep under the stars. What better than a starry sky can give you a sense of awe and bewidlerment, dizziness, even? And it is addictive… Not advertising anything, but that's how I first heard the phrase…