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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 24 votes cast
Aug
25
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
24
accepted Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?
Aug
11
comment Why is 'while' sometimes a synonym of 'whereas', and sometimes of 'although'?
Like the contrastive 'while', 'but' can carry the idea of cause and effect or not, there is a 'but-although-even though' and a 'but-whereas-instead'
Aug
11
comment Why is 'while' sometimes a synonym of 'whereas', and sometimes of 'although'?
@PeterShor & John Lawler: do you want me to change the first sentence to the one provided in the second answer, "Nepal is mountainous while/whereas Holland is flat."? (Don't you agree that here, replacing 'while' with 'although' would be incorrect?)
Aug
11
comment Why is 'while' sometimes a synonym of 'whereas', and sometimes of 'although'?
@choster: as I said in my comment to the second answer, 'while' can mean 'two things at the same time, without the idea that those things are in contrast', it can mean 'two contrasting things at the same time, without the idea that there should normally have been a cause and effect relationship at work' and it can mean 'a(n ineffectual) cause and not the expected effect, or the opposite of the expected effect'. That is why replacing a word with a synonym can be so tricky. 'While' is very polysemic and you must know which of its meanings you are dealing with in order to replace it correctly.
Aug
11
comment Why is 'while' sometimes a synonym of 'whereas', and sometimes of 'although'?
and the reason you cannot replace 'while' with either 'although' or 'whereas' in your sentence is that there is no contrast, no opposition between 'cook' and 'watch TV' whereas there is between 'mountainous areas' and 'flat areas', between 'more densely populated' and 'less densely populated'. 'While' can carry the idea of time only, time and contrast only, or time, contrast, and (thwarted) causality
Aug
11
comment Why is 'while' sometimes a synonym of 'whereas', and sometimes of 'although'?
I followed your suggestion, although, I think 'is (made of/consists in) mountains/plains' can easily be understood and is not poor usage.
Aug
11
comment Why is 'while' sometimes a synonym of 'whereas', and sometimes of 'although'?
@PeterShor: 'While-whereas' is used when there is no idea of result, of a cause and effect relationship, and 'while-although' is used when there is. 'While', 'one thing at the same time as another' just states a co-occurrence which can be owed to a cause and effect relationship or not, which 'whereas' and 'although' detail.
Aug
11
comment Why is 'while' sometimes a synonym of 'whereas', and sometimes of 'although'?
@PeterShor: because there is no ground for deducing that the south of the country is flat from the fact that the north is mountainous, whereas what normally happens in most countries in the world is that the areas that are mountainous are less populated than the ones that are flat (provided they are not deserts!), so, from the fact that the north of the country is mountainous, you have grounds for deducing that is must be or is very likely to be less densely populated.
Aug
11
revised Why is 'while' sometimes a synonym of 'whereas', and sometimes of 'although'?
followed suggestion in one of the two answers: 'moutains' replaced with 'moutainous' and 'plains' with 'flat' although this did not seem a problem to me
Aug
11
comment “I was used to do” vs. “I was used doing”
@Cerberus: why say "has a slightly different meaning" without stating that difference? A former habit (changed today) for "sb used to do sth" and a habit someone had in the past without any reference to what that habit has become in the present time for "sb was used to doing sth" That would have made your answer even more helpful!
Aug
9
asked Why is 'while' sometimes a synonym of 'whereas', and sometimes of 'although'?
Aug
9
accepted “Why are you asking?” versus “Why do you ask?”
Aug
9
comment “Why are you asking?” versus “Why do you ask?”
but if 'ask' is not a state verb, here, but a dynamic one, and the action is not habitual, then the unmarked form should be in the Present Continuous?!
Aug
9
revised “Why are you asking?” versus “Why do you ask?”
followed Mari-Lou's advice, at last!
Aug
9
suggested rejected edit on “I was used to do” vs. “I was used doing”
Aug
9
comment “I was used to do” vs. “I was used doing”
@Cerberus: I think the queston is worth re-opening.
Aug
9
comment “I was used to do” vs. “I was used doing”
@Cerberus: what, then, is the 'slight difference' in meaning there is between "someone used to do something" and "someone was used to doing something". I would be grateful if you could elaborate on it since, as a foreigner, I do not have the feel for this slight difference.
Aug
9
comment Riches-to-Rags Emotion? Is there a word for when people get accustomed to a higher quality and then have to go back to less?
how about a feeling of "has-been-ness"?
Jul
24
comment What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?
What makes ShreevatsaR feel "disconcerted" when "whom" is used instead of "who" is A LACK OF CONSITENCY IN REGISTER, not a vague feeling, but something that can be explained!