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1h
comment Post genitive usage
The double genitive, as in "a friend of Tom's", is a perfectly grammatical feature of English.
13h
comment “hugest” grammatically correct?
"The Ngram comparing huge/hugest with large/largest shows ..." No it doesn't. Here is the right Ngram to look at. "largest/large" is more than 10%. "hugest/huge" has never been more than around half a percent, and is much less nowadays. But I agree in that I would definitely say hugest is grammatical ... it's used more than many things that are clearly words.
13h
comment Why has “Caucasian” remained in use, while similar terms for other races have fallen out of use?
@Lawrence: Yes, but Caucasian was originally part of a trio, the other two being Negro and Mongol. The natural term corresponding to Asian, African, Australian Aborigine, and Native American would be European. That's where most of my ancestors came from, not the Caucasus.
16h
revised “It was the kind of story that / where you had to be there.” — Are the relative words 'where' and 'that' interchangeable?
added 28 characters in body
16h
comment “It was the kind of story that / where you had to be there.” — Are the relative words 'where' and 'that' interchangeable?
(a) I can't think of a better choice of preposition than for. (b) I said in the first line that sometimes you need to add a preposition.
16h
revised “It was the kind of story that / where you had to be there.” — Are the relative words 'where' and 'that' interchangeable?
added 4 characters in body
16h
comment Pronunciation of /ə/ followed by /r/ in words such as “history”, “accelerate”, “memorize”, etc.
@FumbleFingers: on the other hand, I suspect you pronounce cheetah and cheater the same. For me, the difference between marine and serene is the difference between cheetah and cheater.
17h
revised “It was the kind of story that / where you had to be there.” — Are the relative words 'where' and 'that' interchangeable?
added 10 characters in body
17h
comment Do I use “were”, “was”, or “is”?
Actually, "I asked him if he had been well" would most likely refer to a lengthy period of time when you hadn't seen your friend, and not to a specific earlier time.
17h
answered “It was the kind of story that / where you had to be there.” — Are the relative words 'where' and 'that' interchangeable?
1d
answered Pronunciation of /ə/ followed by /r/ in words such as “history”, “accelerate”, “memorize”, etc.
1d
comment Pronunciation of /ə/ followed by /r/ in words such as “history”, “accelerate”, “memorize”, etc.
What dictionaries are you looking at? Merriam-Webster has /ˈtɛr ər ɪst/ and /ˈtɛr ər'aɪz/. American Heritage dictionary has /ˈtɛr ə rɪst/ and /ˈtɛr ə'raɪz/. Oxford Dictionary Online doesn't have syllable breaks between unaccented syllables, which means you can't tell how they break terrorist. Which leaves Cambridge Dictionaries Online as the one dictionary out of the four I checked that has the pronunciations you say "most" dictionaries have.
1d
comment Should one enclose variable names in commata?
This may depend on the scientific field. In math and computer science, the convention is not to use commas.
2d
comment Is “and” used correctly in this sentence? How does it change the meaning if I remove it?
You've completely changed the meaning of the last clause. In the original, we have a right to be proud of the thing we did to make our country great. In your suggested change, we have a right to be proud of our country. This isn't what the author of the original meant at all.
2d
comment How do Brits pronounce [ee] in “queen” differently to [i] in “pita”?
So vita rhymes with pita?
2d
comment Comma usage in compound sentence with adverb phrase
You should avoid putting a comma both before and after and.
2d
comment Is it considered plagiarism to not place quotation marks following a copied sentence if there are footnotes to indicate the source?
In mathematics, definitions and theorems are often copied verbatim, and they are almost never enclosed in quotation marks. (Of course, the source needs to be referenced.)
Apr
26
comment Why isn't “chez” used as a preposition in English?
"Chez Panisse" is the name of a restaurant. Names get treated differently. If "In and Out" was the name of a restaurant, we'd say "We're going to eat at In and Out", even though we'd never say "We're eating at in my house tonight".
Apr
26
comment Why is it Wrong to use what in place of which (Context of American English) | Specific to GMAT
If it's not an appositive clause, (B) is ungrammatical because what can't have an antecedent. (See the duplicate question.) So you've answered your own question.
Apr
26
comment How to pronounce the names of supersymmetric partner particles of fermions
@sumelic: looking through the book you linked to, it appears that the author merges the British vowels /ɒ/ and /ɔ/. The only place I know where this happens is in the traditional Boston dialect (party = /pɑti/ and potty = /pɔti/). But maybe some Australians do this, too.