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1m
comment How do you use adjective or adverb to modify the gerund?
You're confusing the OP by saying "you should" for things that are really just a matter of style and not grammar.
2m
comment How do you use adjective or adverb to modify the gerund?
Your teacher is wrong. All three of "regular exercising enhances ...", "exercising regularly enhances ...", and "regularly exercising enhances ..." are grammatical. To figure out which one your teacher wants requires figuring out the rules your teacher thinks they obey. We probably can't help you with that.
10h
comment Pronunciation of double G: soft “gg” versus hard “gg”
Any words with gge or ggi that come from Italian, like arpeggio.
20h
comment Coughing captured in writing
It was more onomatopoeic when gh was pronounced /x/.
21h
comment Military terminology for the outbreak of war, or events which begin a World War?
Do you mean the causes of war? Do you mean the invasion of other countries (WW II)? Do you mean escalation of conflicts (WW I)?
21h
comment She dresses different/differently from?
Do you have evidence for this? See Ngram.
2d
comment How does 'but for' mean 'if it were not for'?
These are two different definitions of "but for". Let's take a different example: hard can mean firm and hard can mean difficult, but firm does not mean difficult. Same thing here.
2d
comment Help with Punctuation
Shouldn't it be deadlines? Otherwise, demanding deadline needs an article.
2d
revised How did 'pick out' evolve to mean 'read'?
deleted 105 characters in body
2d
comment How did 'pick out' evolve to mean 'read'?
@Janus: Oops ... I foolishly assumed Etruscan was also Indo-European. But it's possible that in some more complicated way, the Greek word lego was eventually adopted by the Romans (who already had their cognate of it) to mean to read.
2d
revised How did 'pick out' evolve to mean 'read'?
added 201 characters in body
2d
answered How did 'pick out' evolve to mean 'read'?
2d
comment Use of Apostrophe s to show possession when the noun is singular but ends with s
You don't need consistency. One rule that has been in use (at least intermittently) since the 16th century is to add an 's if the pronunciation changes, and just an apostrophe if it doesn't. (And in fact, this is the one that the website you quote uses, even if they don't admit it.) So since you wouldn't say Chamberses, you don't need to add an 's there. Of course, people pronounce things differently, so this doesn't give consistency across different English speakers. But it saves you from producing horrible spellings like Ramses's, Chambers's, and Ross'.
2d
comment Why the letter “g” discrepancy between *giant* and *gigantic*?
The word gigantic replaced the earlier gigantine in English; gigantine was borrowed from French (the current French word is gigantesque). Presumably the reason that gigantine was replaced by gigantic in English was that scholars preferred it because it was closer to the original Greek gigantikos. I have no idea why gigantesque replaced gigantine in French. But either way, the reason the second g was dropped from the noun but not the adjective is that this is what happened in French.
2d
comment Why the letter “g” discrepancy between *giant* and *gigantic*?
The OED says that gigantic replaced gigantine in English, gigantine having been borrowed from French. Presumably this happened because scholars thought they should use words closer to the original Greek: gigantikos.
2d
comment How to pronounce the polish name “Aronszajn”
@Janus: I believe that Aaron is pronounced with the vowel of air in BrE, and the vowel of at in New York City. But for Aronszajn, /æ/ looks like the best choice.
2d
comment How did 'pick out' evolve to mean 'read'?
Really, if we were used to reading continuous text without spaces, it hardly be any more difficult than text with spaces. There should be a name for the fallacy that both these excerpts have succumbed to, but I don't know what it is.
2d
comment Is there a word that means “having to do with genre” or “with respect to genre”?
Dictionary.com says that the adjective for genre is genre.
2d
revised “except for” vs “other than”
fixed an/a error undoubtedly introduced by editing
2d
comment I'm very confused of using that have/had
They're both correct, in different situations. Please tell us more.