33,311 reputation
256116
bio website math.mit.edu/~shor
location Cambridge, MA
age 55
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen 1 hour ago

I'm a professor in the Mathematics Dept. at M.I.T. I mostly work on quantum computation, quantum information, and quantum complexity, but I am also interested in other areas of theoretical computer science and mathematics.


3h
comment Is it correct to say “Master student in Statistics ”?
Of course, "bachelor student" and "bachelor's student" are pronounced nearly identically, which could explain why lots of people (who may have only heard the expression orally) are writing "bachelor student".
3h
comment A “scientific” word for probably
They don't mean the same thing. And neither one fits the OP's sentence.
3h
comment Regional pronunciation of “houndstooth” as “houndsooth”
Oxford Dictionaries Online and Merriam-Webster agree that, although the "d" is optional, the "t" should be pronounced.
7h
comment A code or some code?
I wouldn't call thing you're writing either "a code", "some code", or "a piece of code". I'd call it "a program", "a module", or "a routine". As I learned computing terminology several decades ago, code is to program like cloth is to garment. You wouldn't say "I'm going to sew you some cloth to wear"; you'd say "I'm going to sew you some garments."
12h
comment A code or some code?
The usage of computer "code" as count noun is certainly not uncommon. See Ngram. I'd like to know how "code" (a count noun for all non-computer meanings) turned into a mass noun for computer code.
14h
comment Is it correct to say “Master student in Statistics ”?
@Arsen: The Ngram should be for "Master's student". It's a possessive. And "Master student" is an odd usages in the U.S. as well, although I think "Bachelor student" is not.
14h
comment Is it correct to say “Master student in Statistics ”?
@painfulenglish: the Ngram may be problematic because "Master student" is used in other contexts. You can fix it by doing an Ngram for "Master('s) student in".
14h
comment Is it correct to say “Master student in Statistics ”?
Looking at Google, it seems that "Master's student in Statistics" is much more common, although "Master student" is occasionally used. See Ngram (you'll have to click search again because there's an apostrophe in the URL). I have no idea what the possessive is doing there; we don't say "PhD's student".
23h
comment Starting a book with this sentence, is it ok?
This is a matter of opinion, and so not appropriate for the site in its current form. For the record, the only two sentences I like are the original and the first of your alternatives. You could ask this question on writers.SE
23h
comment Use of final “s” in -word endings: which words in AmE are correct?
The bit about towards is nonsense. There are lots of Americans who never use towards, but lots of others do. This isn't like colour; that's a spelling difference, but toward and towards are pronounced differently.
1d
comment Pronunciation of the suffix “-uary”
Oxford Dictionaries Online doesn't give consistent pronunciations for these words either, but they're different inconsistent pronunciations.
1d
comment Silent letters in English
@Ypnypn: the British pronunciation of mayor has a silent 'y'; it rhymes with prayer (or at least it used to; the American pronunciation is apparently catching on there).
1d
comment Silent letters in English
Isn't there a silent 'y' in "prayer"? It's pronounced the same way as "aerial"; if it wasn't silent, it would rhyme with "layer".
1d
answered Usage of comparative with a set of adjectives
1d
comment Usage of comparative with a set of adjectives
Like fun, just is one of the one-syllable adjectives whose comparative uses more (I can't think of any beside these two). And because it's more just, they've used more fair for parallelism (you could also say fairer and more just).
1d
comment Where did the L in talk go?
@Hot Licks: In American English, hawk and talk have the same vowel as logger and hock and tock have the same vowel as lager. Do you think there's an 'l' in logger? You just think there's an 'l' in talk because -alk is a way of spelling this vowel before 'k' (although indeed these words used to have 'l's in them in Middle English).
1d
comment Silent letters in English
@Hot Licks: talk without the 'l' is not tock; talk rhymes with hawk, and tock rhymes with hock (unless you're from west of the Mississippi, where hawk and hock are homonyms).
1d
comment Silent letters in English
@Hot Licks: Merriam-Webster doesn't even list the variant with the 'l'. I think that's pretty good evidence that the majority pronunciation is with no 'l'.
1d
comment Silent letters in English
@Hot Licks: "The 'l' in *talk is pronounced in most of the US". Do you have any evidence for that? ... I think most of the US doesn't pronounce the 'l', although certainly some regions do.
2d
comment Is “geometry” plural or singular?
If you're counting hits for Google search, the results are meaningless. Especially since the pages returned for "are" include things like "Characteristics of the geometry of objects are", "Operations that change the geometry of objects are", " the location, function, and geometry of objects are".