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4h
comment When did initial-origin words (PRONOUNCED AS WORDS) start happening?
@Joe Blow ... and now, I really would like to know which meaning of fuck gave rise to windfucker. I would guess mock (somehow imported from the Dutch), but I don't think there'll be any evidence in the corpus. The first meaning of fuck the OED attests in English is the sexual one.
4h
comment Is “extrapolability” an existing english word?
@Janus: Whether -atable or -able is more common seems to depend on the number of syllables: calculate → calculable, permeate → permeable, saturate → saturable, irrigate → irrigable. But dilate → dilatable, relate → relatable, create → creatable.
19h
comment When did initial-origin words (PRONOUNCED AS WORDS) start happening?
@JEL: I looked up the etymology of fuck, and the OED says it was akin to a Dutch word that originally meant mock, fool, strike. The term windstriker doesn't make any sense as a term for the kestrel, whose claim to fame is one of the very few birds that hovers in place, disregarding the wind. Both windfooler and windmocker make sense, though. I revised my comment to mock, which is an earlier sense than fool, according to the OED.
19h
comment When did initial-origin words (PRONOUNCED AS WORDS) start happening?
@Joe Blow: the etymology windstriker for windfucker makes no sense at all, knowing the habits of the kestrel. But fuck also meant mock in Dutch, and windmocker is a very apt name for the kestrel, which is now called the windhover. Whoever told you that windfucker meant windstriker and that the bird was now called a windstriker did not know what the f*** they were talking about. Windstriker is not even in the OED.
1d
comment Pronunciation of German proper nouns in America
Germany has a lot of different dialects. How do you know that Anhizer and Krites aren't closer than Anhoyzer and Kroyts to the way that the original German immigrants with these names actually pronounced them?
1d
comment Pronunciation of German proper nouns in America
We don't have the oe sound in English, so we have to use a different vowel. I've heard Girdle instead of Gödel /ɝ/, we have Bayner instead of Boehner /eɪ/, and I've heard Yorn instead of Joern /ɔ/, and Shroder instad of Schroeder /oʊ/.
1d
comment The pronunciation of buoy
@Dog Lover: It's "oo" as in food.
2d
comment Can the word petrify be used correctly in the sentences below?
You can be petrified with fear, astonishment, grief, and maybe indecision. But petrified with exhaustion doesn't really work.
2d
answered what adjective ending in -y best describes someone who thinks they're the centre of the universe?
2d
comment Antonym for the word “Engineering”
Your premise is wrong. Engineers also are involved with the demolition of manmade structures, and study the gradual loss of structural integrity of manmade structures and decide when they need to be replaced because they're in imminent danger of failure. So if you want the opposite of engineering (with respect to its construction aspect), maybe it's engineering.
2d
comment What is meant by a “two-lane” road?
Americans would call the "northbound carriageway" the "northbound lanes". Note the plural.
2d
comment simple present instead of simple past
For confirmation, the OED has, under past tense forms of the verb come, "mod. dial. coome, come."
2d
comment When did initial-origin words (PRONOUNCED AS WORDS) start happening?
Before the 1930s POTUS and SCOTUS may only have been pronounced as words by telegraph operators. Consider the following joke from the Commercial Telegraphers' Journal from 1918, which at the very least shows that these acronyms were not widely used. The sender complying with the request, ran through a bunch of "code" and wound up with "potus." The following conversation took place: "Bk. What's potus?" "President of the United States." "Bk. No; Wilson" is."
2d
comment sentence correction question from SAT
@Vance: is that really what's wrong with E? The have could be part of were able to have, where one can remove the repeated were able to by the rules for elision. Another thing that might be wrong with E is "inherited in" rather than "inherited by".
2d
comment How does one find a word with a rhyming middle syllable?
Note the CMU pronouncing dictionary, which I believe all these tools are based on, has American pronunciation.
Sep
1
revised Can articles be omitted in front of the second and third nouns?
added 1 character in body
Sep
1
answered Can articles be omitted in front of the second and third nouns?
Aug
31
comment What would you call the husband of a widow?
@Blessed Geek: Um ... maybe you want to look up the definition of bereaved. Are you talking about two ghosts?
Aug
30
comment British English spelling: “gripped” or “gript”?
There are lots of respectable and useful dictionaries available on the internet. Dictionary.com is apparently not one.
Aug
30
comment British English spelling: “gripped” or “gript”?
Since they both would be pronounced the same way (unlike "learned" and "learnt"), there's no reason not to spell it "gripped". Look it up in a dictionary. If it doesn't give a past tense, then it's regular and thus "gripped".