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3h
comment Reported speech with changing time expression
I see your confusion. That is not what "next week" or "the following week" means. "Next week" means the week immediately after the week containing today. "The following week" means the week immediately after the stated week.
4h
comment Does it ever happen that native english speakers make mistakes in pronunciation?
Lots of native English speakers make mistakes in pronunciation. On the other hand, there are lots of would-be pretentious snobs on the internet who "correct" pronunciations which are not generally considered wrong.
10h
comment I don't get this joke
@Sven: your (incorrect) translation is much funnier.
12h
comment What does “half try” mean?
It seems to mean the opposite in British English and American English. Quite interesting.
12h
comment What does “half try” mean?
The two Brits answering this question seem to have difficulty understanding this idiom. As an American, I think it's quite clear @Robusto's answer is correct.
1d
comment Geographical distribution of “shall”
Also first person singular interrogatives. Shall I make lasagne for dinner? Will I be paid for this project?
1d
comment How to say fractions like “7/8” or “546/823”
"Not practical for larger numbers" might mean "ambiguous". Is three hundred and twenty seven thousandths 300.027 or 0.327 or 320/7000?
1d
comment Pronunciation of ‘few’ as [ˈfjyu̯]
@Joffysloffy: Have you been talking to Americans? it sounds American to me. There are definitely American dialects that put a [y] somewhere in words with ew (and, I believe, also ones that don't).
1d
comment What is the clearest way to describe two “kitty-corner” buildings?
The OED has citations with spellings that show it's been pronounced cattercorner or cattycorner since the early 19th century in the U.S. Oxford Dictionaries Online has the British pronunciation as Kate-er-corner, but I have never heard the first syllable pronounced Kate, and since they also say it's a North American word, I don't know where they get their British pronunciation from.
1d
comment How to pronounce fractions larger than a twentieth, where the last digit of the denominator is a 1 or a 2? i.e. one thirtieth is to 30 as _ is to 31
@j_random_hacker: eighth and ninth are exceptions only so far as spelling; they're pronounced regularly.
1d
comment Tense question: “invest and get” or “invested and got”?
This isn't the past tense, it's the present perfect, because of the word have. The simple past tense (option two in the OP) sounds ungrammatical to me.
1d
comment Tense question: “invest and get” or “invested and got”?
Definitely not 2 (simple past). But all the others sound fine to me.
1d
revised Bodkins and bodkin - Same word different context?
added 98 characters in body
2d
revised Bodkins and bodkin - Same word different context?
added 34 characters in body
2d
answered Bodkins and bodkin - Same word different context?
2d
comment Bodkins and bodkin - Same word different context?
@jamesqf: The Christian God has no body? I would disagree. Consider Jesus Christ on the cross.
2d
comment When should hyphens be used to make text clearer
John Lawler may address this later, but surely he was being somewhat tongue in cheek when he said "just more unneeded squiggles like Hebrew vowels."
Jul
27
comment Looking for a word like “eulogy”, but for a person that has not died?
A biosketch?
Jul
27
comment The house of a friend of Bob’s
@deadrat: it attaches to noun phrases. Nobody would think "her youngest daughter's dog" means "the youngest dog of her daughter" rather than "the dog of her youngest daughter". But when the phrase involves a possessive "of" (rather than just adjectives and a noun), it's ambiguous.
Jul
27
comment Why is “preconceive” wrong?
Your spellcheck thinks that preconceived only exists as an adjective, like undiscovered. Spellcheck is wrong, even though preconceived is indeed almost always an adjective and not a verb.