Reputation
36,695
Next tag badge:
438/400 score
77/80 answers
Badges
3 61 125
Newest
 Revival
Impact
~2.6m people reached

1h
comment Should “two” as a pronoun be spelled out in AMA style?
I suspect, since they don't mention "two as a pronoun", and the use of "one" as a pronoun for a general person isn't reflected by any corresponding use of "two", that they would want "the 2". I don't like it, either. But dictionaries differ in whether "two" can count as a pronoun.
1h
comment Should “two” as a pronoun be spelled out in AMA style?
One might argue that "one" as a pronoun is different from "two" as a pronoun. And indeed, Oxford Dictionaries Online says that "one" can be a pronoun, but says nothing similar about "two" as a pronoun. You could just replace "the two" with "both" or "they" to avoid the issue altogether.
4h
revised Starting a chapter with ellipsis
added 156 characters in body
4h
answered Starting a chapter with ellipsis
6h
comment optional backshifting confusion
And in this answer, Andrew Leach makes it clear that he endorses the same set of rules that the rest of us are telling you.
6h
comment Why are “and/or” constructions in English not considered grammatically correct?
@Tim: Either does not mean and/or. "For dessert, choose either chocolate mousse or cheesecake." "For dessert, choose chocolate mousse and/or cheesecake." If you were a glutton, which choice would you like to have?
8h
comment Is there a word for a fish's stationary position
How can a fish tread water when it has no feet. :-)
8h
comment optional backshifting confusion
In response to Andrew Leach's comment: he didn't say there are no rules governing the tense of the subordinate clause. If I say "it is raining," when I mean it was raining yesterday, then I am using the wrong tense. Now, suppose I say "John told me yesterday that it is raining," when it was raining yesterday but is sunny today. I'm using the wrong tense for exactly the same reason that I can't say "it is raining," when it was raining yesterday but is sunny now. It's wrong not because of backshifting or sequence of tenses, but simply because it's the wrong tense.
8h
comment reported speech optional backshifting
There are not just two dialects of English. British English has a ton of different dialects, some of which has substantially different grammatical rules. And American English has quite a few dialects, one of which (Southern American) has substantially different grammatical rules. This rule is followed in the standard British and American dialects. There may be some dialects where it's not followed, but if you're learning English, you should use one of the standard dialects.
8h
comment optional backshifting confusion
This must be the fifth time you've asked the same question. You're not going to get any better answers unless you phrase the question differently. My suggestion: change the question quickly (before it gets closed) to ask for an answer from a reputable source, such as a respected grammar book.
9h
comment When to pronounce # for pound, sharp, hash or hashtag?
The name "octothorp" was originally a joke, played by some AT&T technical employees, that got loose in the world. (And the pranksters didn't say anything until—I believe—they had retired and couldn't suffer any consequences.) You can find the story, told by one of the instigators of the prank, somewhere on the internet.
1d
comment Is there a word for a fish's stationary position
But if there's a current, the fish needs to do work to stay stationary.
1d
comment Wording of the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation
The question turns on the meaning of "shall", which has a whole bunch of meanings (two of which are used in this proclamation). So probably both interpretations are grammatical.
1d
comment What english dictionary google translate use?
Google translate uses a proprietary algorithm that doesn't really work like a dictionary. If you just put a single word in, Google translate behaves like a reasonable facsimile of a bilingual dictionary. But since it's actually not, english teachers may not completely trust it.
1d
comment A word in between “lesser” and “greater”
The two species of Old World flamingos are the lesser flamingo and the greater flamingo. There's no plain flamingo.
1d
comment Used is pronounced as /juːzd/ or /juːst/?
Two different definitions. Two different pronunciations. The Cambridge Dictionary link you gave actually has both definitions and both pronunciations. Read it more carefully. (The Oxford dictionary contains both, too, but the other definition is listed under use and is relatively hard to find.)
1d
comment Why is the plural of “aircraft” not “aircrafts”?
If you look in the dictionary, the word craft meaning boat has a notation of "plural usually craft". (While the plural for the meaning occupation or trade is crafts.)
1d
comment International Phonetic Alphabet: why are the symbols used for the letter “i” in “champion” and “billion” different?
To me, /ˈtʃæmp.jən/ sounds fine, but /ˈmɪl.i.ən/ sounds wrong.
1d
comment What is a word for mystery stories where the reader has no idea about what happened?
If at the end of the story, you don't know whether a crime has been committed, and who committed it, it's not a mystery story. The convention in English mystery stories is to tell the reader at the end who is guilty and how the committed the crime. You're looking for Encyclopedia Brown-type stories (I don't know a better name for them).
2d
comment International Phonetic Alphabet: why are the symbols used for the letter “i” in “champion” and “billion” different?
@Janus: Note that the /ɪə/ in the phonetic notation in Oxford Dictionaries Online and Collins Dictionary is not necessarily /ɪ/ followed by /ə/, but is supposed to be the diphthong in idea and fear. This also seems wrong to me. It's not champeern.