31,212 reputation
250107
bio website math.mit.edu/~shor
location Cambridge, MA
age 54
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 1 hour ago

I'm a professor in the Mathematics Dept. at M.I.T. I mostly work on quantum computation, quantum information, and quantum complexity, but I am also interested in other areas of theoretical computer science and mathematics.


1h
comment What word means 'to submit a post' / 'bring to public notice online'?
The appropriate word is post. See Definition 2.2 of Oxford Dictionaries Online: Submit (a message, link, image, etc.) to an online location, such as a blog, social media website, or forum: the list was promptly posted all over the Internet.
10h
comment What does “One can easily give it a miss” mean?
Here, "give it a miss" → "not go to the movie". So "one can give it a miss" literally means it's not a "must-see" movie. And "one can easily give it a miss" would literally mean it's not even close to a "must-see" movie.
11h
comment Modern English to Early Modern English
@Janus: in the 18th and 19th centuries, writers used many more commas than they do today, often including ones that split the subject from the predicate. The publishers have removed most of them from today's editions, as they are now quite distracting to readers. For example, from Anne Brontë: "I think the day I last mentioned, was a certain Saturday, the latest in the October of 1827". I don't know about Shakespeare's commas.
1d
comment When is it correct to use “yourself” and “myself” (versus “you” and “me”)?
But this isn't adequate. In "I told him to call myself later", "myself" should be replaced by "me" even though "I" was previously used in the same sentence.
1d
comment Should I use the subjunctive mood in these sentence?
It's perfectly natural to use the past tense in this construction. See this question.
1d
reviewed Close Are the hyphens necessary in “hard-to-find” or can they go without?
1d
reviewed Leave Open How to pronounce 100ish?
1d
reviewed Close Word repetition when a word is part of more words
1d
comment Correct pronunciation of historic
@Janus: I am one of those people who drop 'h's after consonants (even though I generally say "a historical"). I would usually say "one ‘istoric" and "one ‘allucination", but because of secondary stress, "one hotel", "one hydration", and "one hyena". However, the only one that would really grate on my nerves if you dropped the 'h' is "one ‘yena", I think because I pronounce that with significantly more secondary stress than the others. And I never drop the 'h' in /hju/, e.g., "humidity" and "humanity".
1d
comment Grammar: French conditionnel in English?
Maybe this wikipedia page could help. It seems to say that this is the epistemic sense of the modal verb could. Although, as I said above, the terms epistemic and deontic would only be understood by linguists and grammarians. The rest of us just use the grammar without knowing the name for it.
1d
comment Grammar: French conditionnel in English?
So what you want is the names for the various uses of could? I don't think there's a standard set that would be understood by most educated people (like conditionnel 1 and conditionnel 2 in French).
1d
comment Send versus sends; and has versus have
@Edwin: I found the source. It's definitely a test written by Americans, even though it claims to be testing standard international English. So it's clearly wrong about that question (and, even worse, about the question that tests whether "the company" is plural or singular).
1d
comment Correct pronunciation of historic
@Janus: maybe that's why a smaller percentage of people today say "an hotel" than "an hallucination".
1d
revised Correct pronunciation of historic
dropped *"four"*, because sometimes that ends in a vowel
1d
revised Correct pronunciation of historic
added 5 characters in body
1d
comment Correct pronunciation of historic
@Janus: I pronounce "hydration" and "hyena" with secondary stress on the first syllable. With this pronunciation, they shouldn't behave the same as "hotel" and "historic". And "humidity" and "humanity" start with /hju/ and not /hu/, so even if you drop the 'h', the words still start with consonants.
1d
revised Correct pronunciation of historic
added 112 characters in body
1d
answered Correct pronunciation of historic
1d
comment Should I use the subjunctive mood in these sentence?
What sounds natural is none of the above: "Would you mind if I sent you messages while you're away?"
1d
comment Transcription of pronunctiation
Unfortunately, whatever pronunciation encoding you have there is not SAMPA. Or at least, not SAMPA in its standard form. In SAMPA, 'H' is a consonant and not a vowel.