1,337 reputation
1019
bio website esperantoiseasy.blogspot.com
location United States
age 47
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Mar 20 at 22:20

I am a native speaker of American English, as spoken in the New England region (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and Rhode Island).

I am also somewhat familiar with the dialects of the American South and Midwest. Having traveled to the United Kingdom a few times, I can usually understand British English, provided it is fairly standard.


Feb
16
comment Why do some words have two past tense forms (e.g. “dreamed” vs. “dreamt”)?
@Jon Hanna - Wow, that's some good info. I have added a clarification to my original question. +1
Apr
9
comment How many tenses are there in English?
So, the future doesn't exist?
Apr
8
comment Is there a single word for “one who speaks/boasts a lot about everything”?
Edited my answer.
Apr
4
comment Etymology of “housework” and “homework”
I did find it as "housework" at dictionary.reference.com/browse/housework. I do believe American English tends to lose the hyphens in words more quickly than British English, but I am no linguis. That is just speculation.
Feb
28
comment When should I use “a” vs “an”?
The "h" in hour is not pronounced in American English.
Feb
11
comment Does “having” something imply the possession of it?
@Dhruv Rah Sharma - I see that now. I was attempting to give a general answer to a more specific question. Sorry about that.
Feb
11
comment Does “having” something imply the possession of it?
@jae - It is in my neck of the woods. American English, native speaker. The British (and various legal systems) probably make more of a distinction.
Feb
4
comment What is the correct spelling of “dependent”? Which preposition should follow it?
As kiamlaluno pointed out, American English only uses "dependent" and not "dependant". This is similar to how the British use "licence" and "license", while the Americans only use "license" regardless of part of speech. My spell-checker flags both "dependant" and "licence" as incorrect.
Jan
31
comment What do Americans think of using 'cheers' to sign off an email?
@Orbling - Thanks for clearing that up. As an American, I had no idea what the ubiquitous use of "cheers" by British English speakers was supposed to mean. Now it makes sense.
Jan
21
comment Is it “after 9-hour drive” or “after 9 hour drive”?
@Robusto - I'm an American, and I find this odd. Although it could be that the hyphen is being dropped in informal usage (IME) in the same way that email lost its hyphen a few years back. Formally, you are, of course, correct. At least until folks get tired of typing hyphens... :-)
Jan
21
comment Is it “after 9-hour drive” or “after 9 hour drive”?
@Robusto - Maybe it's just me, but I wouldn't have included the hyphen. Is this a British vs. American difference?
Jan
10
comment What are the abbreviations most commonly used on the Internet?
@jae - I prefer the "F" to stand for "flimsy" since most of them (IME) never completely cover the topic I am looking for right then.
Oct
26
comment What's the origin of Pig Latin?
@Kosmonaut - I never knew that even Pig Latin had dialects. Thanks for the info!
Oct
19
comment What's the origin of Pig Latin?
Shouldn't "Youay" be "Ouyay"?
Oct
11
comment Prepositions used with “Home”
Happy to help out.
Sep
23
comment “Anxious to” versus “eager to”
@Steve - I would understand "I'm keen to" and it would still sound more correct to me than "I'm anxious to" when the speaker is looking forward to the experience rather than dreading it.
Sep
17
comment Is there a real difference between “null” and “zero”?
@mmyers #typedef void NULL will certainly make NULL mean void in a programming context, so the programming analogy really isn't that useful.
Sep
15
comment How to pronounce New Orleans
From an anthropological perspective, however, pronounce it like the locals when actually in New Orleans, or you may be frequently asked, "You aren't from around here, are you?". Of course, if you're speaking with a non-local accent, the pronunciation of the city is not what will first give you away to the locals.
Sep
13
comment When did it become correct to add an “s” to a singular possessive already ending in “‑s”?
Must have changed around that time, then. In the 70s and 80s, "James's" would have been incorrect. "James'" was considered correct back then. I was also taught in the northeastern US (Connecticut).
Sep
12
comment How unusual are Nancy Gribble and Nero Wolfe?
@Shinto - Your question was "How unusual?" and "What is the reaction?". I have expanded my answer to include the "reaction". I have marked my answer CW because the "reaction" part cannot be addressed properly without anthropological, psychological, or linguistic research on the subject.