1,332 reputation
1019
bio website esperantoiseasy.blogspot.com
location United States
age 47
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Mar 20 at 22:20

I am a native speaker of American English, as spoken in the New England region (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and Rhode Island).

I am also somewhat familiar with the dialects of the American South and Midwest. Having traveled to the United Kingdom a few times, I can usually understand British English, provided it is fairly standard.


Sep
4
comment What is an appropriate response to “what's up” greeting?
I usually prefer the standard "not much" answer, but occasionally go with the very casual "How's it hangin'?" question in response. This is only done among close male friends and never in a business or formal setting. The "it" in the question is a veiled reference to the penis (American English). Non-native speakers should probably never use "How's it hangin'?" in response to "What's up?". For those wondering why I left the ending 'g' of of "hanging", the reason is that is is a casual response and don't make the effort to enunciate it properly.
Sep
4
revised What is the meaning of 'That about covers it'?
edited tags
Sep
4
comment Examples of different roots (and different meanings) coming to be spelled the same
@Shinto Sherlock - Usage may depend upon geographical location or the English language entertainment genres one enjoys. Also, the above are phrases which one is likely to encounter when reading literature or watching movies or television shows set in certain parts of Europe centuries ago. In the US, we have a television show called "Merlin", set in Medieval Camelot, in which one regularly hears the phrases "run the gauntlet" or "throw down the gauntlet".
Sep
4
awarded  Organizer
Sep
4
revised Are there sentences in languages which use grammatical gender that lose meaning when translated into English?
edited tags
Sep
2
answered Explanation for “emails”?
Sep
1
revised When is it correct to capitalise 'earth'?
Clarified answer.
Sep
1
answered When is it correct to capitalise 'earth'?
Aug
31
answered What's a word similar in usage to “diatribe,” but not as harsh?
Aug
29
comment “To call” vs. “to ring”
Regional variation - In the US, prefer "I'll call you back shortly" over "I'll ring you back shortly". In my experience, we (Americans) never say "I'll ring you back." We do, however, frequently say, "I'll give you a ring," but this is quite informal.
Aug
28
answered What is the difference between “I forgot” and “I had forgot”?
Aug
28
comment What does “thy” mean?
@DJClayworth - In some parts of the southern US, "y'all" is singular and "all y'all" is plural.
Aug
28
revised Is the word “yearling” appropriate for a recurring event?
Pluralized "event" in first sentence for numerical agreement.
Aug
27
comment “Will discuss the matter” vs. “will discuss on this matter”
Also "Meeting participants will discuss...", "Topics discussed will include...". There are many options to convey the same general meaning.
Aug
27
comment Is the word “yearling” appropriate for a recurring event?
@Shinto - Why not? If SO is still around in 100 years, they could even have a centenarian badge.
Aug
27
answered Is the word “yearling” appropriate for a recurring event?
Aug
26
comment Do “in future” and “in the future” imply different meanings?
Interestingly, "in future please take care" returns over 295,000 hits, whereas "in the future please take care" only returns about 37000. Yet, in my experience, (US New England and Midwest regions), I have never heard "in future" used this way, either colloquially or in formal speech. Is there a regional variance of which I am unaware?
Aug
23
answered Finding out the proper word out of book-learned vocabulary
Aug
19
comment When should I use “in” or “on”?
@Alan - I grew up in Connecticut and always said/heard "in line". However, my cousins from New York say "on line", so even in the northeast there is variation from state to state.
Aug
19
awarded  Teacher