1,322 reputation
1019
bio website esperantoiseasy.blogspot.com
location United States
age 47
visits member for 4 years
seen Mar 20 at 22:20

I am a native speaker of American English, as spoken in the New England region (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and Rhode Island).

I am also somewhat familiar with the dialects of the American South and Midwest. Having traveled to the United Kingdom a few times, I can usually understand British English, provided it is fairly standard.


Sep
13
comment When did it become correct to add an “s” to a singular possessive already ending in “‑s”?
Must have changed around that time, then. In the 70s and 80s, "James's" would have been incorrect. "James'" was considered correct back then. I was also taught in the northeastern US (Connecticut).
Sep
12
comment How unusual are Nancy Gribble and Nero Wolfe?
@Shinto - Your question was "How unusual?" and "What is the reaction?". I have expanded my answer to include the "reaction". I have marked my answer CW because the "reaction" part cannot be addressed properly without anthropological, psychological, or linguistic research on the subject.
Sep
12
revised How unusual are Nancy Gribble and Nero Wolfe?
Expanded answer
Sep
12
revised How unusual are Nancy Gribble and Nero Wolfe?
edited for clarity
Sep
12
answered How unusual are Nancy Gribble and Nero Wolfe?
Sep
12
answered Where can I get the list of diminutive forms of first names?
Sep
12
awarded  Critic
Sep
10
comment Pronunciation of the word “laboratory”
Also, we Americans have a tendency to shorten words, so "lab" is perfectly fine in informal speech.
Sep
5
comment Why do some words have two past tense forms (e.g. “dreamed” vs. “dreamt”)?
@nohat - Thank you. What an awesome answer! It appears my preferences don't have as much to do with overall word commonality as I originally thought. I always wondered why the way I spoke differed so much from what I read. I think, as Peter Eisentraut pointed out, that my spoken preferences are a combination of age, register, and education. It is interesting that "lit" and "leapt" are becoming more popular, whereas "dreamt" is losing favor. Perhaps this is because "dreamed" and "dreamt" differ little in the effort required to speak them and the former is more regular?
Sep
5
awarded  Scholar
Sep
5
accepted Why do some words have two past tense forms (e.g. “dreamed” vs. “dreamt”)?
Sep
5
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
4
comment How do native English speakers respond to “Thank you”?
@kiamlaluno - Thank you for the clarification. I misunderstood your original comment.
Sep
4
comment Redundancy in American Usage
@kiamlaluno - Please do not make assumptions about all Americans. Perhaps what you're running into is regional variation. While living in the Northeast, we would say "10 a.m." or "10 o'clock in the morning". When I moved to the Midwest, I noticed I frequently hear people say "10 a.m. in the morning", which is ridiculously redundant because "a.m." already implies "before noon".
Sep
4
comment How do native English speakers respond to “Thank you”?
@kiamlaluno - While I cannot speak for everyone in the US, I will tend to use more formal language when speaking to non-native speakers of English. Perhaps the person you know does the same?
Sep
4
answered How to add emphasis to a modal verb
Sep
4
awarded  Commentator
Sep
4
comment “More clear” vs “Clearer”: when to use “more” instead of “-er”?
It should be noted, as everything else in English (sigh), that there will almost always be an exception or two. The one that comes immediately to mind is fun -> more fun.
Sep
4
awarded  Student
Sep
4
asked Why do some words have two past tense forms (e.g. “dreamed” vs. “dreamt”)?