1,337 reputation
1019
bio website esperantoiseasy.blogspot.com
location United States
age 47
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Mar 20 at 22:20

I am a native speaker of American English, as spoken in the New England region (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and Rhode Island).

I am also somewhat familiar with the dialects of the American South and Midwest. Having traveled to the United Kingdom a few times, I can usually understand British English, provided it is fairly standard.


Apr
9
answered How many tenses are there in English?
Apr
8
comment Is there a single word for “one who speaks/boasts a lot about everything”?
Edited my answer.
Apr
8
revised Is there a single word for “one who speaks/boasts a lot about everything”?
Edited for clarity
Apr
8
answered Is there a single word for “one who speaks/boasts a lot about everything”?
Apr
4
accepted Etymology of “housework” and “homework”
Apr
4
comment Etymology of “housework” and “homework”
I did find it as "housework" at dictionary.reference.com/browse/housework. I do believe American English tends to lose the hyphens in words more quickly than British English, but I am no linguis. That is just speculation.
Apr
3
asked Etymology of “housework” and “homework”
Mar
25
revised Is a statue made of bronze called bronzed or brazed?
Corrected spelling in title
Mar
25
suggested suggested edit on Is a statue made of bronze called bronzed or brazed?
Mar
15
revised Difference between 'obliterate' and 'eliminate'
Made question more grammatical.
Mar
15
suggested suggested edit on Difference between 'obliterate' and 'eliminate'
Mar
2
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Feb
28
comment When should I use “a” vs “an”?
The "h" in hour is not pronounced in American English.
Feb
11
comment Does “having” something imply the possession of it?
@Dhruv Rah Sharma - I see that now. I was attempting to give a general answer to a more specific question. Sorry about that.
Feb
11
comment Does “having” something imply the possession of it?
@jae - It is in my neck of the woods. American English, native speaker. The British (and various legal systems) probably make more of a distinction.
Feb
10
answered Does “having” something imply the possession of it?
Feb
4
comment What is the correct spelling of “dependent”? Which preposition should follow it?
As kiamlaluno pointed out, American English only uses "dependent" and not "dependant". This is similar to how the British use "licence" and "license", while the Americans only use "license" regardless of part of speech. My spell-checker flags both "dependant" and "licence" as incorrect.
Jan
31
comment What do Americans think of using 'cheers' to sign off an email?
@Orbling - Thanks for clearing that up. As an American, I had no idea what the ubiquitous use of "cheers" by British English speakers was supposed to mean. Now it makes sense.
Jan
31
answered What do Americans think of using 'cheers' to sign off an email?
Jan
24
answered Correct way to express “'worthy of falling in love for”