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Dec
12
comment Is there a visual equivalent of the word “overhear”?
accidental peek?
Nov
30
comment When can a celebrity be referred to by their surname only?
The case of Nigella is similar to Attenborough.
Nov
21
comment Why is it incorrect to answer “because I have to finish my report by the end of this week” to the question “Why do you work so hard?”
@Jim On a Saturday I always use "this"
Oct
23
comment What is a verb that means 'to make a small amount of money last for several days'?
but the plan for spending your money isn't necessarily one that consists in 'small amounts'.
Oct
17
comment Why are plurals ‘*humen’ and ‘*Germen’ not conventional?
+1 for 'two Republicen were reading their Qur'en' :-)
Sep
24
comment “I am finished my sandwich” sounds correct but “I am started my sandwich” does not?
Also, "I am finished" can mean "I am exhausted, I give up." But it's somewhat colloquial.
Sep
24
comment What is the name of a small unluxurious restaurant?
And I always thought a hole in the wall was an ATM!
Sep
24
comment What is the name of a small unluxurious restaurant?
This is a "cha cha teng"!
May
11
comment What's a correct expression for professions in which you do a lot of sitting?
@ChrisW, you're right. Oops.
May
8
comment An antonym for “shortcut”
@NaBob, you must be misunderstanding the word. A «détour», in the original French, is when you leave the main path to follow another one. French Canadians say «s'écarter», which has the same meaning as «se détourner». In England, some would say "roundabout" rather than "detour" because using French words is "posh" and "educated" and some people find it pretentious (to be educated). But at any rate, the simplest answer is just "the long way."
Jan
2
comment Word which means - “decreases the beauty ”
Good to know. I'll see if I can make it stick. I've not been successful at all with "doable", which draws contempt from my contemporaries. ;-)
Jan
1
comment Word which means - “decreases the beauty ”
@bof, I meant in real life, I've never heard anyone use it without obviously making a reference to Alice. (I'm a big fan of Alice, I was at Christ Church to visit the rabbit hole)
Jan
1
comment Word which means - “decreases the beauty ”
enlaidir (French), afear (Spanish), enfear (Portuguese), imbruttire (Italian), for the ones I know: it's about time English had uglify. +1. But I must admit, I'd never heard it before.
Jan
1
comment Word which means - “decreases the beauty ”
my favourite: to defile. Also nice: to debase, to degrade, to de-whatever essentially.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
25
comment Idiom for “just because you give something a different name, it doesn't change what it is”
I may be misunderstanding, however, the one that came to mind is "call a spade a spade".
May
10
comment Are there English equivalents to the Japanese saying, “There’s a god who puts you down as well as a god who picks you up”?
I do not know what the Japanese idiom is supposed to mean, but there's an apparent difference: in your expression the good thing follows the bad thing, in the Japanese idiom no such order is assumed, as far as I can tell with the limited information available. It would be interesting to know if the Japanese idiom could be used after someone wins the lottery, as a way of saying "tread carefully, behave well", and if so then your suggestion would not capture its spirit (speculating here).
May
10
comment Are there English equivalents to the Japanese saying, “There’s a god who puts you down as well as a god who picks you up”?
If this is the Bible we're talking about, it wasn't written in English and there are many translations available: the two sentences are close enough, so I wouldn't say it's a misquote. If anything, it's a better translation than the translation you have quoted below it.
May
3
comment Any word for “made by combining parts of many things”?
in the arts, you have "collage", in industry an "agglomerate", and I think a "composite" is pretty general.
Apr
16
comment What modal verbs do natives use nowadays?
Yes, the OP is very clear about a desire to clarify spoken/written context.