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I have a PhD in economics. I mostly use Python, Maple, Matlab, Stata, and more recently R.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
25
comment Idiom for “just because you give something a different name, it doesn't change what it is”
I may be misunderstanding, however, the one that came to mind is "call a spade a spade".
May
10
comment Are there English equivalents to the Japanese saying, “There’s a god who puts you down as well as a god who picks you up”?
I do not know what the Japanese idiom is supposed to mean, but there's an apparent difference: in your expression the good thing follows the bad thing, in the Japanese idiom no such order is assumed, as far as I can tell with the limited information available. It would be interesting to know if the Japanese idiom could be used after someone wins the lottery, as a way of saying "tread carefully, behave well", and if so then your suggestion would not capture its spirit (speculating here).
May
10
comment Are there English equivalents to the Japanese saying, “There’s a god who puts you down as well as a god who picks you up”?
If this is the Bible we're talking about, it wasn't written in English and there are many translations available: the two sentences are close enough, so I wouldn't say it's a misquote. If anything, it's a better translation than the translation you have quoted below it.
May
3
comment Any word for “made by combining parts of many things”?
in the arts, you have "collage", in industry an "agglomerate", and I think a "composite" is pretty general.
Apr
16
comment What modal verbs do natives use nowadays?
Yes, the OP is very clear about a desire to clarify spoken/written context.
Apr
15
comment Gramatical correctness of a sentence from To Kill A Mocking-Bird
The comma is a substitute for a quotation mark, that's all. (the point marks the end of the quote)
Apr
15
comment What modal verbs do natives use nowadays?
you have to trade off the benefit of blending in and the risk of getting these idioms completely wrong. I had to make a list of banned words for my students, like "wanna" or "gotta" because foreigners would think them acceptable otherwise. I've had more than a dozen "wanna to" in my career, in formal exams. Yikes!
Apr
15
comment What modal verbs do natives use nowadays?
English is a permissive language that allows speakers much flexibility, but "don't gotta go" is out of bounds. Besides that, I doubt these tips would be any good once you leave Alaska. Certainly, not in my neck of the woods (couldn't resist this one). My tip would be: stay with standard English (BBC, CNN, CNBC or something like that). The risk if you try to speak like a rapper (besides getting roughed up), is you'll wind up saying absurd things like "I wanna to" or "I gotta to".
Apr
14
comment Are there metaphoric English expressions meaning “keeping composure at a fatal moment, never panicky”?
stiff: "not easily bent or changed in shape", I can make mine stiff, but perhaps it's like wiggling ears, not everyone can ;-)
Apr
13
comment Are there metaphoric English expressions meaning “keeping composure at a fatal moment, never panicky”?
News Headline: "General Lee as cool as cucumber as confederacy surrenders."
Apr
13
comment Are there metaphoric English expressions meaning “keeping composure at a fatal moment, never panicky”?
I don't think this qualifies as "metaphoric" (but I could be wrong).
Apr
13
comment “If I were you, I'd apologise to my/your mum”
@Mari-LouA, that's avoiding the problem by introducing ambiguity. If you want to avoid it completely: How about If I were you, I'd apologize. But I don't feel that either answers the question asked here.
Apr
4
comment In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?
@bib, I don't know any professional cooks to ask, unfortunately... In French, they call them «spatule à retourner» (according to a website that sells utensils to professionals), which essentially means «flipping spatula» :-)
Apr
4
awarded  Commentator
Apr
4
comment In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?
Google essentially gives you the most common usage among people whose age is probably below average and social status probably above -- fine by me, but worth pointing out.
Mar
22
comment What is a word that means “a person or thing which is small yet capable of defeating big giants”?
isn't that rather more usually "giant-slayer"?
Mar
22
comment What is a word that means “a person or thing which is small yet capable of defeating big giants”?
you'd probably write "a David", meaning you're referring to the mythical David, as opposed to my mate Dave.
Feb
26
comment Why do Americans add “The” in front of a team name, but the British do not?
... omitted "the" for laughs.
Feb
26
comment Why do Americans add “The” in front of a team name, but the British do not?
@Jon: Cottagers?