502 reputation
1415
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location Calgary, AB, Canada
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen yesterday

profile for corsiKa on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites

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Formally known as "glowcoder".

Seasonally known as "corsiKlause Ho Ho Ho".


Aug
26
comment A word for converting numbers to (number / 1000) + K
I can't seem to find anything on the Internet using "dot com numbers". Is that a phrase localized to some place?
Aug
12
comment What is the “‑cide” word for killing one’s husband?
What happened from 1840 to 1860 that made people talk about matricide? Wtf?
Aug
7
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
5
comment What is a word that means “someone who pretends to be your friend but is actually your enemy?”
I don't know if this is coincidence or not, but I've only ever seen this in cases where money or a reward was involved.
Aug
1
comment Meaning of “Mr Right's first name is Always”
It's tough because this relies on two pop culture/colloquial expressions in order to make the joke. But like they say, if you have to explain the joke, there is no joke.
Jul
25
comment Why is Gilt a word when we have Gilded? Is this town big enough for the both of them?
In all honesty, Edwin, I only hear "speeded" from schoolchildren and I never hear "bended". I will admit to having heard "burnt" and "burned" - usually, "burnt" when describing food and "burned" for everything else. I bet that has an interesting history just like Gild.
Jul
25
comment Why is Gilt a word when we have Gilded? Is this town big enough for the both of them?
@choster Kind of, but not really. That question seems to reinforce my point that each 'dual word' has a history behind it. It is that history that I'm looking for in this question, which would never be addressed by that question.
Jul
25
comment Why is Gilt a word when we have Gilded? Is this town big enough for the both of them?
@tchrist I've never seen learnt and lent used legitimately (in that context. I've obviously seen lent as loaned or as a religious holiday). I have occasionally seen both gilded and gilt, though.
Jul
25
asked Why is Gilt a word when we have Gilded? Is this town big enough for the both of them?
Jul
17
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
15
comment Is there a polite alternative to “No thanks, I'm full”?
"+1 for the included gestures" (in a joking / laughing manner)
Jul
15
comment What can a man that owns land for agriculture be called without using “farmer”?
These days? You could call them "broke", despite their 18 hour days...
Jul
15
comment A word for one who loves only one girl throughout his life
In this context, "love" is meant to be an intimate, generally sexual, relationship. If a "one man man" is intended to not be a selfish person, he would by definition be a gay man.
Jul
15
comment A person who criticizes his own homeland/city/country?
As someone who fits the bill 100%, "resent" is the exact feeling I have toward the absolutely terrible place, filled with absolutely terrible people, in which I was raised.
Jul
14
comment A word for one who loves only one girl throughout his life
But can one be in love in the absence of faith?
Jul
14
comment A word for one who loves only one girl throughout his life
It would be good to have a phrase that didn't involve "man" or "woman" though. For example, is a "one man man" a gay man who is eternally devoted to a single man? Or his a "one man man" a man who isn't devoted to anyone but himself?
Jul
10
comment 'Little' and 'small' in British vs American English
I would hear littlest if the person was trying to point out something quirky. "He's the littlest stinkin' brat you've ever seen!" If they were referring to a child who had not achieved the height and weight of their peers, then I would expect to hear smallest.
Jul
8
comment Why are female wizards called “witches”?
I should have clarified that - I meant specifically that wizards were male witches and witches were female wizards.
Jul
8
comment Why are female wizards called “witches”?
What is the earliest usage of linking Wizard and Witch? My suspicion is that prior to Harry Potter a witch was unarguably a female warlock, not a female wizard. But Rowling, wanting something to go good with wizard, choose witch. Admittedly, it does flow nicely.
Jul
2
comment Word meaning crying, but not crying?
I'm not sure I understand the relevance of most of the second and the whole of the third (and naturally, the fourth) chapters of this post. The first is quite straight-forward, and the second starts to get digressive after the first paragraph. I'm not saying it isn't useful to someone, but I don't see its usefulness here. Does tracing the spelling back eventually yield additional candidates for the word?