Reputation
1,065
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
1 9 18
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~45k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 3 helpful flags
  • 55 votes cast
Apr
25
comment Is it conceivable that President Obama might use the word “queue”?
@ZachLipton He could have said "I .. am .. a .. Londoner!" and see what happened, I suppose. Worked for that other president who pandered to locals in Europe.
Apr
4
comment How to jokingly express an “if you pay me, I'll say it” attitude?
Pretty sure there's never a bad time to drop a Groucho Marx line :-)
Mar
30
comment What is the word for always YES (100%) or always NO (0%), never in-between
Curious why this might have been downvoted - all the words apply and the first one is literally tailored for this exact situation.
Mar
29
comment What is the word for always YES (100%) or always NO (0%), never in-between
@simon in that case, you'd be better off with "distinct", "enumerated" or "discrete" instead of "absolute".
Mar
29
answered What is the word for always YES (100%) or always NO (0%), never in-between
Mar
29
comment What is the word for always YES (100%) or always NO (0%), never in-between
This is definitely how I would describe the situation to most people.
Mar
28
comment What is this method of joking about a morbid situation called?
I've only ever heard the term "Black Comedy" to mean "A comedy routine performed by a black comedian and targeted at a black audience." If you listen to the Sirius XM comedy stations, you hear very, very different comedy on the Foxxhole than you do on Jeff n Larry's Comedy Roundup. I would not expect "Black Comedy" to ever mean "Dark Humor". Ever. This may be a recent development, though - this comedy genre only became super popular after the 80's and Eddie Murphy. And, let's be clear: "Black Comedy" (as defined above) is not inherently racist, merely demographic. "Black Jokes" are racist.
Mar
28
comment What is this method of joking about a morbid situation called?
@Mast breaking peoples' necks with ropes was a multicultural fad for many centuries.
Mar
18
comment What do tweezers do?
@sumelic every single citation there references tweezers. "To handle or extract with tweezers." "to take hold of or pluck (hair, small objects, etc) with or as if with tweezers". Clearly, not standing alone.
Mar
18
comment What do tweezers do?
The reference you cite specifically uses tweeze as a back-formation of tweezers. I'm looking for something that would have existed independently of tweezers themselves. (After all, if tweeze existed before tweezers, then how did the name tweezers come about?)
Mar
18
comment What do tweezers do?
@sumelic I'm looking for something that doesn't involve "tweezers" themselves. I couldn't find a word that stands alone.
Mar
18
revised What do tweezers do?
added 98 characters in body
Mar
18
comment What do tweezers do?
I don't know if it counts to reference tweezers in the definition of tweeze. Seems like cheating.
Mar
18
asked What do tweezers do?
Mar
4
awarded  Yearling
Feb
12
comment Single word for “Someone who's in on a secret”
A conspirator can be doing one of two things: something nefarious, or dreaming by a fire in a winter wonderland. Anything else is right out.
Feb
11
comment “To science the sh*t out of something”
I like this, but it doesn't tackle the second half of the sentence, where tacking "the shit out of this" as opposed to this implies a task of greater magnitude, intensity, or risk.
Feb
1
comment Isn't a “gonner” or “gonna” slang for a person about to die?
@Mari-LouA That depends. These days it's highly offensive because it's generally reserved as a racial epitaph targeted at blacks. Historically, it's no different than "you dirty rat".
Feb
1
comment Isn't a “gonner” or “gonna” slang for a person about to die?
Possibly the extra n was because of the short o? Even though it's already present in gone...
Jan
29
comment Is “times” really a plural noun?
Times doesn't go with plus and minus. Multiplied by and divided by do.