935 reputation
1021
bio website smith-li.com
location Philadelphia, PA
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen 3 hours ago

Pythonista; Celerista; Pyramista; Plonista; Magentoasta; Javascriptista; CSSista; HTMLista; Webista; Shellista; you get the gista.

I am an employee of eBay Inc. The opinions expressed here are my own and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of eBay Inc. This is my personal StackExchange account.

Classic disclaimer.


Jul
31
comment Correct word for Unsubmitted?
Unsubmitted sounds the most natural to me, but pre-submitted seems to best describe the state you mean.
Jun
24
comment Mars Anniversary
Speaking of orbital bodies, lunar periods are especially ambiguous. Is a lunar year the orbital period of the moon around Earth, or the Earth year as measured in ... months?
Apr
2
comment Antonym of “exodus”
If exo- means "outward" and endo- means "inward"… (How I wish English worked this way more often…)
Mar
13
comment “Semantic”s relation to “Pedantic”
The words have completely different meanings, but that's just semantics.
Feb
26
comment What's the opposite of “omniscient”?
@Pacerier you just equated being not omniscient with being the opposite of omniscient. That's ignorant!
Feb
25
comment Etymology of “half-assed”
@MrLister {{citation_needed}}
Feb
20
comment Adjective that means “disableable”?
@Candide You want a disabler disabler? How meta!
Feb
4
comment What do you call a poem or song that sets up a rhyme and then ignores it?
@mplungjan I think the Shrek example is a little different. You're supposed to expect a specific word, not just the rhyme. The rhyme is a tool to misdirect the audience to precisely that word. Maybe it's a matter of degrees, but I see it as a different end product.
Jan
25
comment Is it “peek”, “peak” or “pique”?
+1 because you cover the common turn of phrase, and then go on to make a point about a possible pun that is reasonable and grammatically correct. @SteveMelnikoff's link to m-w shows that to peak can be used transitively for the very meaning in question here.
Jan
16
comment “To shoot out of cannon into sparrows”
I had heard it as Don't bring a knife to a gunfight, but that particular phrase suffers from a lack of just. Nothing wrong with having a knife at a gunfight, as long as you have a gun, too. Also, as anyone who has been in close-quarters combat will tell you, having just a gun at a knife fight is not overkill, it is ineffective.
Oct
12
comment What is the opposite of organic (food)?
@AndrewLeach no specific context, but pure curiosity.
Oct
12
comment What is the opposite of organic (food)?
@Kris I don't understand why such a term precludes the existence of its antonym; even so, though, if your point is about the definition of antonym, can you come up with a word that describes the relative complement of organic food in food (set theory)?
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
@J.R. I'm not really averse to the value judgement, but to be fair the question is not which is better?, but which came first?
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
+1 for the careful thinking on the subject.
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
If you're going to make value judgements about it, then why don't we drop all the two-word phrases and just go for pithy alternatives like obvious and blatant? :)
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
And yet blatant is just another word that has obvious in its definition – not that that rules anything out, but it makes me sad for the creativity of the human race.
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
That a thing glares at you is only one definition of glaring. Is there documented etymology to suggest that the other definitions of glaring stem from this? Also, the word blaring comes from the Middle English bleren, and is not a combination of glaring and blinding.
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
Evidence, or just a general sense?
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
@tchrist I wish I had known the word eggcorn five minutes ago. Anyway, the question could be phrased, which is the eggcorn and which the original, I suppose.
Sep
24
comment What is the context of Mark Twain's “If you don't like the weather…” quote?
…and speaking of lacking context, why the downvote?