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Nov
29
asked When did the term 'leverage' gain its verb/debt-related meaning?
Oct
12
comment What is the opposite of organic (food)?
@AndrewLeach no specific context, but pure curiosity.
Oct
12
comment What is the opposite of organic (food)?
@Kris I don't understand why such a term precludes the existence of its antonym; even so, though, if your point is about the definition of antonym, can you come up with a word that describes the relative complement of organic food in food (set theory)?
Oct
12
asked What is the opposite of organic (food)?
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
@J.R. I'm not really averse to the value judgement, but to be fair the question is not which is better?, but which came first?
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
+1 for the careful thinking on the subject.
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
If you're going to make value judgements about it, then why don't we drop all the two-word phrases and just go for pithy alternatives like obvious and blatant? :)
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
And yet blatant is just another word that has obvious in its definition – not that that rules anything out, but it makes me sad for the creativity of the human race.
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
That a thing glares at you is only one definition of glaring. Is there documented etymology to suggest that the other definitions of glaring stem from this? Also, the word blaring comes from the Middle English bleren, and is not a combination of glaring and blinding.
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
Evidence, or just a general sense?
Oct
8
comment “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
@tchrist I wish I had known the word eggcorn five minutes ago. Anyway, the question could be phrased, which is the eggcorn and which the original, I suppose.
Oct
8
asked “Glaringly obvious” vs. “blaringly obvious”
Sep
24
comment What is the context of Mark Twain's “If you don't like the weather…” quote?
…and speaking of lacking context, why the downvote?
Sep
24
asked What is the context of Mark Twain's “If you don't like the weather…” quote?
Aug
15
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
10
comment Term for “Death by Lack of Water”
But the verb forms of dehydration and even thirst aren't as useful as that of starvation. He starved to death is perfect English. He dehydrated/thirsted to death sounds odd.
May
25
accepted What is the term for the slash in a slashed zero?
May
25
asked What is the term for the slash in a slashed zero?
May
17
answered Alternatives to “Good Night” when sleeping in the afternoon
Apr
2
accepted What is a “Chain of Chinese whispers”?