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  • 0 posts edited
  • 2 helpful flags
  • 110 votes cast
Nov
28
answered What do you call a person who prevents his/her own progress?
Oct
26
comment I haven't been sleeping vs I haven't slept
"I haven't slept well for 3 days" would be an idiomatic way of saying that sleep has been fitful or difficult.
Jul
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
21
comment What does “tearing your résumé apart” mean?
possible duplicate of What does "tearing your résumé apart in a way" mean? by the same user
Jul
21
comment What does “tearing your résumé apart” mean?
I don't see a separate second meaning. I think she is criticizing the resume, but her statement is meant to show that she recognizes that fact, and soften the blow (perhaps because she would be even more critical of other resumes).
Jul
21
awarded  Commentator
Jul
21
comment What does “suite your self” mean?
"Suite" and "suit" should be pronounced quite differently, but here in Western Pennsylvania, people speak of a "bedroom suite" (of furniture) and pronounce it "suit".
Jul
21
answered What does “tearing your résumé apart” mean?
Jul
20
awarded  Yearling
Jul
20
answered A word for paying attention to detail
Jul
20
comment Is “banana” the shortest overlap word?
@FumbleFingers You appear to be lost. This is my answer to the question. Meta is down the hall, second door on the left.
Jul
20
comment “I like cat” type of sentences
Why did you use plural "apples" but singular "cat"? "I like cats" sounds just fine to me.
Jul
19
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
19
comment Is “banana” the shortest overlap word?
I'd definitely say it's the best-known, but rococo might meet the threshold of well-known, and Macaca had an unfortunate moment in the spotlight recently.
Jul
19
answered Is “banana” the shortest overlap word?
May
2
answered A word for the heart-wrenching pain of wanting someone you can't have
May
20
awarded  Critic
May
20
comment Make/take a photograph?
Both "take a photograph" and "make a photograph" are used in English, though the former is far more common among the general public. A discussion of the distinction: photo.stackexchange.com/questions/5936/…
Feb
28
awarded  Yearling
Nov
4
comment What's the origin of “beta” to describe a “user-testing” phase of computer development?
The first version of FreeBSD I ever installed was 2.2-GAMMA. It was a stage much like a "release candidate," and I think the project has moved to the RC terminology since then.