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visits member for 4 years, 1 month
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20h
comment WC Formal phrase for “trademark” (tendency)
I don't see any way in which this even attempts to answer the question. -1.
21h
comment When you come back / when do you come back / when are you coming back?
Where is "Future Tense" in either the question or this answer?
21h
comment How are basement levels in shopping malls designated?
Joe Blow: "Lower ground floor" seems quite clear to me. It's the floor below the ground floor.
21h
comment Which is correct: “A is higher as compared that” OR “A is high as compared to”?
But as Roaring Fish says, it is very odd to talk about the weight being "high". You could say the weight is greater than all of its counterparts, (but probably not the weight is great, compared to ...); but much more natural is A is heavy, compared to ... or A is heavier than ...
21h
answered Correct tense for a sentence
21h
comment 1700s term for “a technology”
No, it means the stocks.
22h
comment what is called a subdivision of a grate
Normally it means a frame in which you build a domestic fire. Here, I don't know the word, but it sounds like a development from grating.
22h
answered “Tax on” vs. “tax over”
23h
comment “Tax on” vs. “tax over”
I've never encountered tax over: can you give an example? If I google "tax over", apart from this question itself, every example on the first two pages of results is either tax over (a period of time) or pay tax over the phone.
23h
comment Why must the infinitive be used after “I am qualified to”?
In a good dictionary, yes, though it may not be exhaustive. If you look up "qualified" in the Oxford Learners' Dictionaries, it says "Qualified for something" and "Qualified to do something".
23h
comment 1700s term for “a technology”
@Cerberus: certainly, though maybe not by the 1700's. The OED s.v. engine, meaning 5 ("A tool, implement, or simple mechanical device. Now arch.") has 16th century examples " in the stokkis or sic uther ingine." and "Ropes and other yngynes."
2d
comment 1700s term for “a technology”
Yes, or "engine"
2d
revised 1700s term for “a technology”
Point to the normal Wikipedia, not the mobile version.
2d
comment 1700s term for “a technology”
Certainly not. The earliest attribution for mechanization in the OED is 1839, and that includes the phrase the mechanization of man, so it clearly means "the process of turning man into a machine".
Sep
18
answered Why do some questions not start with an auxiliary verb?
Sep
18
answered What's the meaning of “to him who”?
Sep
18
comment How to write Vietnamese names in English correctly? (“Việt Nam” to “Vietnam” or “Viet Nam”?)
There are lots of them (though I don't know how many cover Vietnames names). Just google "Style guide foreign names"
Sep
17
comment Is there any difference between saying “for long” or just “long”?
In this context no, because it's talking about something lingering. But long after brushing refers to a point of time, while for long after brushing refers to a period. Though in my idiolect, I would not say for long after brushing: I would say for long (though normally only in the negative). But if I wanted to qualify it I'd say for a long time after brushing.
Sep
17
revised Should “International community” have a definite article?
format list for clarity
Sep
17
comment Why is “five dollars” written “$5” and not “5$”?
But the only answers to that posting that attempted to actually answer the question put forward plainly mythical answers. All the rest were variations on "Because that's how we do it, and others do it differently"