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Nov
20
comment Where did the L in talk go?
I don't know of any accent of English that has an /l/ in "talk" and "walk". In British English AFAIK there is no /l/ in "palm", "psalm", "calm", "half", "calf" or "almond" either, but there I think other accents do pronounce at least some of them with /l/.
Nov
20
comment Is it wrong to use 'not" in sentences that have an “all…not” form
@Kris: I don't know how to answer you. Many sentences are ambiguous without being in any useful sense wrong or irregular or senseless.
Nov
19
comment Is it wrong to use 'not" in sentences that have an “all…not” form
As John Lawler says, that is one possible interpretation of "all nouns did not verb", but not the only one.
Nov
19
comment Is it wrong to use 'not" in sentences that have an “all…not” form
@Kris: I find the two exactly parallel in the relevant features: All ... [neg vb], with its attendant ambiguity of whether the all is within the scope of the not or not. But Aditya's first example is neither irregular, nor incorrect, nor fails to make sense. It is merely ambiguous.
Nov
19
comment Throw a ball up versus Throw up a ball
There's also another idiomatic use of throw up which is not about vomiting, eg That run threw up several errors.
Nov
18
answered Throw a ball up versus Throw up a ball
Nov
18
comment Can one talk “with” someone?
@WS2: I have no interest in fashion, and therefore no interest in "correct". But when I read "talk with" in a sentence I generally conclude that the writer was American (or for an American audience, or ... ). It would be grammatical, but unidiomatic for me to say it.
Nov
18
answered Playing from sheet music
Nov
18
comment Is it wrong to use 'not" in sentences that have an “all…not” form
This form (which has always seemed odd to me) is sanctioned by venerable usage, in particular in the proverb "All that glisters is not gold". In general I prefer paraphrases like your second sentence.
Nov
18
answered “A nounfull” of something
Nov
18
comment “A nounfull” of something
That's true, but since this is a figurative meaning, it might not be so helpful if the questioner is not a native English speaker.
Nov
18
comment “A nounfull” of something
But that is a different suffix, with both the meaning and the grammar different: it forms an adjective, not a noun. The question was about -ful meaning approximately the volume of. This answer is irrelevant to the question. -1
Nov
18
comment Is there a difference between “for this purpose” and “to this purpose”?
I'm not sure why you are asking me to answer anew, as nothing has changed. VonC's example "Limit the use ... to this purpose only" does not contain the idiom "to this purpose".
Nov
15
answered Can “As [adjective] as [noun] is” in the beginning of the sentence mean “Although/despite [noun] is [adjective]”?
Nov
15
answered A question on anaphoric and cataphoric references
Nov
15
comment Is there a difference between “scaffold” and “scaffolding”?
My experience may be atypical, because I have worked in theatres for many years, and we often use "scaff" for building sets.
Nov
15
revised to have more work given her
Typo
Nov
15
comment “P-U-L-L” vs. “P-U-double L”
@MarkFarnell: I don't think "triple" (or "treble") is nearly as common - it almost never comes up in spelling, of course. I have long referred to that as "treble-u", which is inaccurate but cute.
Nov
14
comment Is saying “can you do this for me” rude?
@Araucaria: I suppose it is, in a way; but to me pleases and thank yous seem not to be part of the language, but of something else.
Nov
14
answered to have more work given her