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Jul
28
comment “neither/nor” in a sentence
@shogun, that is what I called the afterthought use: just with an asyndetic clause rather than a separate sentence.
Jul
28
comment Can i say “Advanced Default Interface”/“Advanced Classic Interface”?
This is not a question about English Language and Usage. It is a question about user interfaces.
Jul
28
answered “neither/nor” in a sentence
Jul
28
comment 'Participle phrase', 'Participle clause', 'Participle construction'
These are not standard phrases, so every grammar book which uses one of them may use it slightly differently.
Jul
28
comment How was English orthography reformed?
There is no connection whatever between Received Pronunciation and any attempt to prescribe a standard. RP is a descriptive term used to refer to a de facto standard, which was prescribed only in the sense that the pundits and schools taught it, more or less.
Jul
28
comment How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?
I've never encountered it (UK)
Jul
28
answered What did the sea win?
Jul
22
comment Joyful vs Joyous
"Joyous" usually refers to the event which causes joy, not to the person experiencing it. "Joyful" may refer to either.
Jul
22
answered Can we say “you can [not go] to school” or does it automatically become a negative sentence?
Jul
22
comment How can I understand these puzzling sentences?
@Jarl. We cannot tell what specifically the writer had in mind about Summer. But I don't think it is about clothing.
Jul
22
comment How can I understand these puzzling sentences?
@Robusto: I don't think that's all of it, because of the careful comparison of levels.
Jul
21
answered “With his face (being) red, he shouted at the top of his lungs.” Which sentence do I have to use?
Jul
21
comment “With his face (being) red, he shouted at the top of his lungs.” Which sentence do I have to use?
"At the top of his lung" is not an idiom. "At the top of his voice" is.
Jul
21
comment Find the grammatical error in sentence
"Should have done", like "have done" refers to a state where something has already happened. It is hard to see how we could ever manage to put ourselves in a state where something has already happened, since it either has already happened or it hasn't.
Jul
21
comment An alternative word to 'Delegate'
Indeed, I would not expect a person taking an exam to be called a delegate at all.
Jul
21
answered Should “is” be used here?
Jul
21
answered How can I understand these puzzling sentences?
Jul
21
answered Do english accents in England have both germanic and celtic influences?
Jul
21
answered Whishes if only and will
Jul
20
comment the usage of 'be'
Technorc Luke, your paraphrases assume that built introduces a relative clause modifying future systems. It doesn't. Be is the verb of the that clause which is the object of the main verb propose.