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1d
answered got ready vs is ready
2d
answered “weaker” or “more weak”?
2d
comment Dropped the pen and threw up the sponge
No, a sponge and a towel are two entirely different things, that are likely both to be used by a boxer's support team. It is not helpful to guess about meanings when others have given a complete answer. The fact that "clout" means hit and formerly also meant cloth is a complete irrelevance.
May
25
revised Does orchestra need “the” before it?
Add many similar examples.
May
25
answered Does orchestra need “the” before it?
May
25
comment “That” – Which of the following sentences uses correct English grammar?
@Inquiring. Both are grammatical, and the sentence that you now say you want clarification on is also grammatical both with and without the 'that'. With that longer, more complicated sentence, I judge that there is a greater possibility of misreading it as two sentences (it only takes the presence or absence of a full stop, since 'I' is capitalised anyway), so adding 'that' to the written version will reduce that risk, but that is not a question of grammaticality. Nor is it necessary to recapitulate the verb 'play': again both possibilities are grammatical.
May
25
revised Neither, or nor, or both
Apply Fumblefingers' corrections
May
25
comment Neither, or nor, or both
You're right, @FumbleFingers. I'll edit my answer.
May
25
comment “That” – Which of the following sentences uses correct English grammar?
@Sankarane: perhaps the form with 'the' is more natural for you. It isn't for me. I could say it, but I would be expressing some extra meaning by doing so - perhaps greater distress at the prospect at being made to play one of those games.
May
25
comment “That” – Which of the following sentences uses correct English grammar?
@Inquiring: in writing, you might worry about that ambiguity. In speech - that's not how most people speak. We say what we mean, and if it turns out to be ambiguous, (which we discover by our interlocutors' reactions) we fix it afterwards. In any context I can think of, the prosody will distinguish "Don't make me play games I don't want to play" (with neither a fall on 'games' nor a pause after it) from "Don't make my play games. I don't want to play" (with both).
May
25
answered Which one is grammatically correct, with “the” or without “the”? Why?
May
25
answered Neither, or nor, or both
May
25
comment “That” – Which of the following sentences uses correct English grammar?
I don't agree with your correction: "Don't make me play games I don't want to play" is grammatical, and for me more idiomatic than with "the". To me "the" implies that the speaker and the hearer both know just which games are being talked about, while omitting "the" does not imply that.
May
25
comment “That” – Which of the following sentences uses correct English grammar?
Both, as @A.Ellett says. In a relative clause, the relative pronoun (who or which) or complementiser (that) is optional as long as the noun phrase (here, 'games') is not the subject of the relatlve clause. Incidentally, questions at this level may be better suited to the English Language Learners site.
May
24
comment “manufacturing time” vs. “manufacture time”
Like most "why" questions about language, the whole of the answer is "because that's how it is" Sorry.
May
24
answered A sentence with double negative
May
21
answered when using the titles of Dr. should it be followed by their first name or last name
May
21
comment How do you write an idiom (or phrase) in the possessive case?
No, @tchrist, that is the kind of answer I said I object to. "Don't use it, just because we can't work out (or agree) how to write it" is a counsel of despair, and puts the writing cart before the speaking horse. I don't agree with Allan that "a bun in the oven's meaning" is cromulent in speech; but if he finds that it is, he needs to be able to write it, or writing is not doing its job.
May
20
comment How do you write an idiom (or phrase) in the possessive case?
The possessive clitic 's is very rare in English except for animates, or things which are being regarded like animates (for example, organisations, or machines). Using it with an abstract like a quoted phrase is so unusual that it would risk not being understood, in my opinion. Therefore the question does not arise. (Note: normally I object to answers that say "work round it". But that is because they are usually about ways to write something that is perfectly normal to say. I don't believe this example is in that category).
May
19
awarded  Nice Answer