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2d
answered What is correct - “Take a look at it once” OR “Once take a look at it”?
2d
answered Double negation or not
Feb
9
comment It were cucumbers or It was cucumbers
"It was cucumbers"; "They were cucumbers".
Feb
9
comment Why is the word watch pronounced differently from words like patch, latch, match, catch, and batch?
@RoaringFish: fair comment: correlation does not imply causation. Nevertheless, the fact remains that a majority of English words where 'a' follows 'w' or 'qu' (and there is no following 'e' or equivalent) have a rounded vowel - the LOT vowel or the WAR vowel where there is an orthographic 'r' following - and few words with 'a' not preceded by 'w' or 'qu' have these vowels. Assuming this is not an arbitrary orthographic convention (which is possible, but I know of no reason why it should be) the obvious assumption is that the preceding rounding has modified the vowel sound.
Feb
8
comment Theatrical Term Describing Technicians and Ensemble
I would use "company" to comprise cast and crew (and directors etc)
Feb
8
comment Why is the word watch pronounced differently from words like patch, latch, match, catch, and batch?
@RoaringFish: for local pronunciations without rounding: I said that it didn't apply to all such words anyway: you're just saying that the list of exceptions is diffierent in different dialects. For the second list: I didn't say that all instances of /ɒ/ were affected by a preceding /w/; just that many of those where you would expect /æ/ have a preceding /w/.
Feb
8
answered Why is the word watch pronounced differently from words like patch, latch, match, catch, and batch?
Feb
8
comment why do we use 'prepared' in a sentence like this
No it is not a rule; but many adjectives formed from past participles (such as prepared) are more often used predicatively than attributively; that is, it is more common to say that something is/was/will be prepared than to talk about "a prepared thing". For that reason, many (probably most) instances of "prepared" are preceded by a part of "be".
Feb
7
comment Meaning of “to hand over to”
Sorry, @ManishRai, I don't know what "your timing in this site" means. Certainly you can ask more questions, but they may be better suited to English Language Learners.
Feb
3
comment be + to + verb and be + verb
It's not something that I would regard as grammatical.
Feb
3
answered be + to + verb and be + verb
Feb
3
comment “used to go”or “went”
The OP asked why "went" is incorrect. Aside from that fact the HotLIcks, Peter Shor, and I all think that it is not incorrect, your answer does not give any explanation that I can understand. (I have no idea what "terbiasa" means, which doesn't help). I think you're saying that with the habitual expresssion "every summer", you need a "used to": but you are simply restating that, not explaining it.
Feb
3
comment “used to go”or “went”
I don't see how that answers the question at all.
Feb
3
comment What does this phrase mean: «smth isn't exists»?
Fair comment, @Mari-LouA
Feb
3
comment If I 'will' have the chance to go to the US
"If I have", or "If I ever have" to convey the distance in time, or the uncertainty. For the career, perhaps "If I eventually have a successful career".
Feb
3
answered Meaning of “to hand over to”
Feb
3
comment If I 'will' have the chance to go to the US
I don't know about "wrong", but both are unidiomatic.
Feb
3
answered If I 'will' have the chance to go to the US
Feb
3
answered What does this phrase mean: «smth isn't exists»?
Feb
3
comment The amount of members of each network {} not comparable
There is no "right". I would say "are", but I would not use "amount" with a countable set, so I would say "the number of members of each network are not comparable". But there are two separate sources of confusion here, neither of which has a "right" answer. First the tension between the singular formal subject "amount" (or "number") and the plural logical subject "members" - most people would use a plural verb there. Secondly because of the "each", because the comparison is over more than one amount/number. Ignore Word's grammar module, which can't cope with English.