Reputation
47,277
Next tag badge:
88/100 score
30/20 answers
Badges
42 123
Newest
 Revival
Impact
~6.2m people reached

5h
comment Starting a sentence with can
You are of course entitled to make whatever assumptions you like about the largely unknown way in which the brain stores information. Using those assumptions to answer questions about language is a questionable procedure.
23h
comment Does the term “E-post” exist (in English)?
No, the hole in or by the front door of most houses is not a "postbox", it is a "letterbox". A "postbox" is the red box with a slot set in a public place where you can send mail by posting it. Many postboxes are the tradiional self-standing cylindrical shape, and are also called "pillar boxes".
1d
awarded  Revival
1d
comment Using “to start” as a ditransitive verb
Yes - it's not ditransitive, "crying" is a representative of a complement clause.
Apr
29
comment Why do words like mean (in the context of '__ means ___') require an s?
@deadrat: different "that". the subject is "those little things".
Apr
29
answered Is this free indirect speech ? “ …and would I please … ” And why is “please” necessary?
Apr
29
comment Is this free indirect speech ? “ …and would I please … ” And why is “please” necessary?
There is nothing in the slightest passive about either of the examples. "Please" is effectively an adverb (you can call it an interjection if you like) and the verb "be" and "keep" is active in both cases.
Apr
29
answered can we use `localite` for business entity?
Apr
29
answered Do I use “were”, “was”, or “is”?
Apr
28
comment “Scaffolding” or “A scaffolding”?
ab2 quotes examples of it used as a count noun, from a dictionary. On what grounds do you assert that a non-count noun is "more correct"?(Myself, I have never heard it as a count noun, but clearly others disagree).
Apr
28
answered List of English word subjunctives
Apr
28
answered Difference among Show as, Show with, and Show by
Apr
28
comment Can a proposition be mistaken for a 'claim'?
I think you are confusing language with logic. You are looking for a precision which simply does not exist: for some people you may be correct; for others you may be incorrect; for some your question may be incoherent. Your title "mistaken" implies that you think there is a definitive answer (and that you are right). I don't believe that to be the case.
Apr
25
comment You better vs. You have better
Because that's what English does. (As with most "why" questions, that is the whole of the answer).
Apr
24
comment Need an example of “lengthened, curtailed, and altered forms of words.”
I read it as "lengthened [or] curtailed [or] altered". In any case, if there is a problem in the English, this may be a problem introduced in the translation, or it may be an ambiguous rendering of ambiguous Greek, or it may represent something that the translator didn't fully understand in the Greek. It is not necessarily possible to resolve it in the English translation.
Apr
24
answered You better vs. You have better
Apr
24
comment Need an example of “lengthened, curtailed, and altered forms of words.”
Aristotle, of course, was writing in Greek, not English. I don't know clearly what he meant, but it could have been something which doesn't exist in Engtlish.
Apr
24
comment Starting a sentence with can
And your source for that far-reaching claim?
Apr
20
comment What is the origin of the idiom 'all the rage'?
Your theory is, at present, an unsupported speculation; at odds with several other answers which have supporting documentation. Occam's razor is a heuristic for choosing between theories when none of them is any more supported than any other.
Apr
20
comment How long would the conference be for?
I'm sorry, but this answer is quite wrong. In "How long do you need me to hold an object for", the "for" has nothing whatever to do with a person, and everything to do with the time.