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visits member for 4 years, 2 months
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6h
comment How do you pronounce an obscure name like Kaiomi
And Cambridge in Gloucestershire doesn't sound like Cambridge in Cambridgeshire.
7h
answered “If you get lonely, I hope you phone me” vs. “will phone me”
7h
comment Noun for 'expecting' as in 'expecting couple'?
I think it would still work in that case.
7h
comment “Came undone” in this context?
No. Done doesn't mean fastened (though done up does). In this sense undo is the opposite of do up, not of do.
1d
comment Do you write “here is some stuff” or “here are some stuff”?
Stuff is a mass noun, so always construed with a singular verb.
1d
comment “Came undone” in this context?
While I agree with your general point, I think your analysis is wrong. Came undone is nothing to do with do as in do one's hair: it is the normal meaning of undone as unfastened.
1d
comment Why does modern English only have one affirmative response?
Questions about "why" in language development nearly always have only one answer "Because that's how it happened".
1d
answered Noun for 'expecting' as in 'expecting couple'?
1d
comment Pronunciation of file format GIF
The question makes the false assumption that there is one side that is "right". The whole of the answer is what you said: some people say one and some say the other.
1d
comment Are they correct and colloquial?
It's hard to answer that without knowing more about the context in which you want to say it, but I would probably say something like "My grandmother is no longer with us, but she lived to an old age", or perhaps "to a fine old age" if I want to be enthusiastic. Others would no doubt say "passed away", but I hate that particular euphemism. And depending on who I was talking to, I might say "is dead" rather than any euphemism.
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
26
comment Help do or Help doing
Because that is how the verb help (in the sense of aid or assist) works. (There is another help, always used in the negative, and meaning avoid, or find another way, which does take the gerund: "I can't help being late").
Oct
25
answered Are they correct and colloquial?
Oct
25
answered Why are web browsers browsers, but I am a surfer?
Oct
25
comment Why are web browsers browsers, but I am a surfer?
Joe, I think you have misunderstood Tim's question. I think he is asking why, when browser and surfer are apparently formed in the same way, one means the tool, and the other means the user of the tool. As you say browser can be used to mean the person, but surfer cannot be used to mean the tool.#
Oct
25
comment Pronouncing “A”: “ai” vs. “ah”
@PeterShor: I think that pronunciation is not unknown in the UK. Lewis Carroll rhymed rations with quotations in The Hunting of the Snark - it's possible that this was a deliberate distortion, but I don't think so.
Oct
23
comment Should 'g' followed by 'e' and 'i' be pronounced with a soft or hard g?
Words that are borrowed from other languages vary depending on when they were borrowed, and which language they come from: and people's understsanding of the letters changes with time. "Ginseng" almost certainly had a 'j' sound in whatever version of Chinese it was borrowed from, and so would probably be written "jinseng" if it were to be borrowed into English now; and Genghis Khan's name in Mongolian would today be transliterated as "Chingiz". But I've heard many people pronounce both of these in English with a /g/.
Oct
23
comment “none like him” vs “none like unto him”
In the seventeenth century like unto was a compound preposition, equivalent to modern like.
Oct
23
answered “none like him” vs “none like unto him”
Oct
22
comment “(1) stop, (2) drop, (3) and roll” or “(1) stop, (2) drop, and (3) roll”
I would use the second. "Correct" in general depends on which style guru you want to listen to.