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7h
awarded  Explainer
16h
comment -er for two, -est for three or more?
Excellent answer. +1
16h
comment Does this grammatically make sense?
Neither I had forgot nor if I would forget is grammatical in my idiolect, though I am aware that both can be in some dialects.
19h
comment -er for two, -est for three or more?
There is such a rule, that some idiot invented a couple of hundred years ago, and people who care how other people speak insist on. It never made any sense.
19h
answered Does this grammatically make sense?
2d
comment accadimic english
I'm sorry, we won't do your homework. Show us what you have tried, and what you are not sure of, and we can explain. You might find our English Language Learners site more appropriate to your needs, but they still won't do your homework for you.
2d
comment Should I use Well? or What?
In Britain, the normal phrase is "Sorry?", and in very formal contexts "I beg your pardon?". Saying "Excuse me?" in that context marks you as American, or some other kind of foreigner.
2d
comment Can “hand in hand”, “face to face”, “miles and miles”, “coast to coast” be considered “irreversible binomials”?
Here's a reversible irreversible: in my dialect (North London) there is a dish called "egg and chips" (which is what is says it is: a fried egg with chips). In Willy Russell's play Shirley Valentine, she invariably calls the dish chips and egg, which sounds wrong to my ears. I believe this is a feature of Liverpool dialect, rather than an idiosyncracy of the character.
2d
comment If it don't VS If it doesn't
And the answer is that it is not grammatical in standard English, but is grammatical in many non-standard varieties, such as many songs are written in. I don't know who downvoted your question either.
2d
comment What parts of speech are in the sentence, “He went to the moon”?
Parts of speech are traditionally words, not phrases, so in a traditional analysis to the moon is not a part of speech. In some more modern analyses, it is a Prepositional Phrase (PP)
2d
comment When referring to “one”, use “his” or “their”?
@Kris: my point was that he, him, his were never normal as resumptive pronouns after one in British usage.
2d
comment Which is or are grammatically correct: “Cats are carnivores / carnivorous or carnivorous animals”?
Of course not all members of Carnivora are actually carnivorous.
Sep
28
comment When referring to “one”, use “his” or “their”?
"One's" is usual in British English. I understand from my reading that American writers in the past generally preferred "his".
Sep
28
comment If it don't VS If it doesn't
In the late 19th Century, W.S.Gilbert put phrases such as if it don't in the mouths of upper-class people in his plays: if you are looking at literature of that period, you may find other examples. Today it is seen as non-standard, and associated in most people's minds with uneducated speech.
Sep
27
comment Which is correct: 'that type always does' or that type always do'?
@EdwinAshworth: your "there are people ... who prefer" sounds like a grudging "OK, I suppose it's all right then". I can't speak of the status of the form in North America, except for the disapproval I've read, but I assure you that in British English (I don't know why you refer to that as a 'misnomer') it is normal and doesn't raise an eyebrow.
Sep
26
comment Which pronoun to refer to “person”? It? He or She? They?
No. Who is he, who are they are perfectly good, but in those the pronoun refers to something. Who is it is a different construction, with a different meaning.
Sep
26
answered Which is correct: 'that type always does' or that type always do'?
Sep
26
comment Correct the mistakes
@Ellie: if you showed some evidence of having attempted to answer the questions, but could tell us where you got stuck, people might be willing to give you some help. If you just dump your homework questions on us, nobody is likely to be interested in helping.
Sep
26
comment Italian vs Italic
The use predates computer fonts by several centuries!
Sep
26
comment Should “International community” have a definite article?
@Araucaria: true. I've now added it.