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 Yearling
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1d
comment What does “I'm a while.” mean?
It makes no sense at all to me. I think Isaac Pounder is correct.#
1d
comment Use of “age” as an uncountable & countable noun
People of a different age to me means unambiguously "people of a different age from what we have just been discussing".. People of different ages and People of various ages both mean "people who are not all the same age".
1d
comment Is “People of Mars, why most of you are just losers?” grammatically correct?
That answer is correct, but almost completely unhelpful, because it doesn't specifically address the root of the issue, which is that in direct questions in English the verb normally precedes the subject.
1d
comment “by now” with Present Perfect
They're not grammatical in my idiolect.
1d
comment Use of “age” as an uncountable & countable noun
"A various anything" is incoherent, as "various" requires plurality. "People of a various age" is nonsense to me.
2d
answered Use of “age” as an uncountable & countable noun
2d
answered Is it “in the episode” or “on the episode”?
Aug
25
comment “Amply funded, and consisting of many high born, wealthy gentlemen…”
"Crop up" you can find in any good dictionary: it means "occur unexpectedly". The Society is The Royal Society (the subject of the paragraph), whose members originally were mostly gentlemen. "Serves to" is an elegant phrase for "does". One of the meanings of "check" is "halt", or "limit".
Aug
24
answered I will not in any case kick the ball or I will in any case not kick the ball?
Aug
24
answered Do I have to put “that is” in this sentence?
Aug
24
comment “Amply funded, and consisting of many high born, wealthy gentlemen…”
That is a long and intricate sentence, but its meaning seems clearly built up from its component parts. What is it that you are having trouble with?
Aug
22
comment Is “apps” a concatenation?
If a lemon had four legs and a trunk, would it be an elephant? That seems to me as sensible a question as yours. A false antecedent entails any consequent you life.
Aug
20
comment Using “done” instead of “did”
The boy done good is a catch-phrase, and as such may get used by people who would never otherwise use its grammar.
Aug
20
comment Difference between “What time do you come to class every day?” and “What time do you go to class every day?”
It is somewhat ambiguous. it probably means the time they leave home, but in some contexts it might mean the time they arrive, especially if go to is being used in the different sense of attend, and the conversation is not focusing on travelling at all.
Aug
19
answered Using “done” instead of “did”
Aug
19
answered Difference between “What time do you come to class every day?” and “What time do you go to class every day?”
Aug
17
comment Disagreement between subject and verb
The point I am making is that "correct" is entirely a social judgment, and is out of place in linguistic discussion (except explicitly sociolinguistic discussion), I object to it because of the connotation that non-standard varieties are wrong or inferior.
Aug
17
comment Disagreement between subject and verb
On the contrary, the lyricist wrote fully grammatical English. It is just that the variety of English in which they were writing has different rules from various standard Englishes. "He don't" is grammatical in many varieties of English (including upper-class British English of the 1880's).
Aug
17
comment Disagreement between subject and verb
Your use of the word "correct" implies that you are talking about fashion (or 'etiquette', as some would call it): a set of social rules for deciding whether people behave according to the norms of the favoured group or not. As I said, in many varieties of English "he don't" is grammatical. As you imply, using the "wrong" variety of English for the social context may get you into difficulties.
Aug
16
awarded  Yearling