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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen 15 hours ago

15h
comment Word for 'Lacking a subject'
@FumbleFingers: I agree with medica: the problem is that the OP has not managed to characterise the literary device they are asking about; we can only guess what they mean.
15h
comment What does “a bare foot” and “flat on his belly” mean in this context?
This is incoherent and nothing to do with the question.
15h
comment What does “a bare foot” and “flat on his belly” mean in this context?
The phrase is unfortunate, because bare foot is a very common collocation (also as the adverb barefoot) but normally refers to a person's foot. That is not what is meant here, which is foot the measure.
15h
comment What does “a bare foot” and “flat on his belly” mean in this context?
You can say cheers for thank you in many parts of the English speaking world (including mine, British). I don't know whether it is used everywhere.
21h
comment Equivalent for “optimizable”
Even if you could find it in no dictionary whatever, that would not establish that it was not a word.
21h
comment Verbs within a prepostional phrase
But only the semantics can tell you that: structurally, it could equally well modify dog, and people get hours of fun from wilfully misinterpreting such sentences
21h
answered Verbs within a prepostional phrase
21h
comment Verbs within a prepostional phrase
The with phrase does not modify dog, it modifies the predicate washed the dog.
Apr
15
comment Does the etymology of the word “government” mean “to control the mind”?
The French adverbial suffix -ment does indeed derive from the Latin word (not suffix) mente, ablative of mens "mind". The nominal suffix -ment already existed as a suffix (-mentum) in Latin, and I have always understood that it is a thematic extension of the neuter nominalising suffix -men (as in nomen "name = that by which something is known" and flumen "river = that which flows") which is of Indo-European age (cf Greek -ma eg "dogma = that which is taught", Russian -mya, eg vremya "time", and English -m eg gleam = "that which glows".
Apr
15
comment Is “something appetite” correct as a noun?
The The Commercial is a common pub-name in Yorkshire, where I now live.
Apr
15
comment Principle Of Life
No, principle does not mean beginning. One of the meanings of Latin principium was beginning, but that tells you approximately nothing about the meaning of any English word.
Apr
13
answered Is the English-speaking Internet community moving towards Americanized spelling?
Mar
31
comment Usage of the future subjunctive
@tchrist: I agree with you, but Alexander Gil didn't. In his Logonomia Anglica of 1616, (one of the first grammars of English), he solemnly lists the paradigm of the "future subjunctive", which goes "that I may be hereafter"; "that thou mayst be hereafter" etc,.
Mar
30
comment Is there a rule for pronouncing “th” at the beginning of a word?
In my idiolect (and I think most accents from England, but I'm not so sure about Scotland), "with" always has [ð].
Mar
30
comment Origin of plurality of “wars” in phrases like “Star Wars”
I think this may well be a snowclone: with one exception, all the examples I can think of are either science fictional, or metaphorical. The exception is "The Wars of the Roses".
Mar
30
comment Quantification of Frequency Adverbs
That's not the way language works. Bradd Szonye has pointed out problems with you table in particular; but there's another dimension of difficulty, in that meaning often depends on contextual and extra-linguistic factors, such as the social context and the degree to which the interlocutors know each other.
Mar
26
comment Why did the KJV use “thou” toward God?
I can't make head or tail of this answer, most of which seems to be irrelevant to the question. I find the question clear, and one which has often occurred to me. Even if English were a creole (which I dispute) how is that relevant to the question? Thou was indeed in use for intimates and subordinates in Middle and Early Modern English, corresponding to tu, du etc in other languages; and for a Modern English speaker who knows it only historically it can indeed seem strange to address the deity in that way.
Mar
26
comment Is writing “My English is not the best around” wrong?
I don't find anything in "My English is not the best around" that suggests Eastern Europe (in fact, the reverse, because most Eastern European languages do not have articles corresponding to "the"). On the contrary, as Neil de Baudrap says in a comment, this is informal, idiomatic English.
Mar
26
comment active-passive voice related question
In English, intransitive verbs (those that don't take an object) cannot be put in the passive. "Leave" can be transitive ("Leave this house at once") but isn't in this example. (And in case anybody asks, "Leave this house at once" could have a passive: "Be left at once", talking to the house; but it isn't very likely).
Mar
26
comment What is the plural of “scenario”?
It's not Latin. And the only way you could get to scenaria would be by projecting the Italian word back to a (non-existent, as far as I know) Latin word scenarium, of which scenaria would indeed be the plural.