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1d
comment conditional form
@MariusHancu: Certainly, some people use the literary form "Had he ... " in speech sometimes: I'm sure I have done so myself on occasion. What I described as grotesque was telling a learner that "If he felt" was an error, and "Had he felt" was not.
2d
answered When do I use 'to' and 'ing'? For example, the verb is read
2d
comment conditional form
There's nothing wrong with amusing if. And he had would be more precise, but this was speech. In speech, "correcting" an if clause to an inverted Had he is just grotesque.
Apr
15
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
13
answered Is there a word for 'subject' (of a sentence) that isn't 'term' or 'argument'?
Apr
13
comment Etymology of “high” and “low” notes
This answer replies to the first sentence of the question, while completely ignoring the following explanation of what Iain was asking. The question is about why "high" and "low" are used (rather than some other opposition) and why they are that way round (rather than reversed). -1.
Apr
10
comment “Tom, whom I have not seen yet” or “Tom, who I have not seen yet”
If you are somebody who uses whom, and in a social context where you want to use whom, it is grammatical to use it in that sentence. If you are not, then who is grammatical there.
Apr
10
comment What is the grammatical designation of “that” in “…that she may have…”?
Note that this construction is "early Modern English" - it is archaic in current English.
Apr
10
comment “followed” as a participial phrase
The "restrictive/non-restrictive" distinction only applies to relative clauses, which this isn't.
Mar
30
answered What's the rule behind the use of the articles to refer to something in general?
Mar
28
comment What is the meaning of “Jane raised the lights.”
@JoeBlow: Ell Ex.
Mar
28
comment What is the meaning of “Jane raised the lights.”
@StoneyB: brain fart. I didn't mean "lamps", I meant "lanterns".
Mar
24
comment What is the meaning of “Jane raised the lights.”
Hm. Interesting how like, and how unlike, some of these are in UK theatre parlance. I think I'd say "up" rather than "raise", address the lighting people as "Lx", and take the cyc blues to 70. And "Stand by Lx 16 ... go!" And we tend to have lamps rather than instruments.
Mar
18
comment Correct tense for a sentence
Puzzled why somebody has downvoted this, without a comment.
Mar
17
comment Difference - Cognition and Recognition
Even though they are closely related in origin, they have very little to do with each other.
Mar
16
comment Set the table, or lay the table?
Similar point: in my experience many Americans say set (and expecially set down) where I would say put (down).
Mar
12
answered Why can't I use the word 'to' after the verb 'helped'?
Mar
10
answered What is the independent clause of dependent clause?
Mar
10
comment Call In/For a New Job
Or (in everyday English) "It's the people I applied to for a job".
Mar
9
answered Use of “off of” or “off” with some verbs in place of “on”