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1d
comment Modern English to Early Modern English
I dispute that. It is not required, but to claim that it is "not right" is a zombie rule. I can read it out with or without a pause, so I can write it with or without a comma. As for Shakespeare's punctuation - I think you'll find it was even more unregulated than his spelling.
1d
answered How to parse these two long (subordinate) clauses connected with 'that'?
1d
answered Modern English to Early Modern English
1d
comment How to parse these two long (subordinate) clauses connected with 'that'?
Example of hopelessly contorted syntax = Thinking like a lawyer?
1d
answered Name for setup and reversal style of writing?
1d
answered Why was Zormpa changed to Zorba?
2d
comment 'How comes it' or 'How come is it'?
I have no idea why it was downvoted.
2d
answered 'How comes it' or 'How come is it'?
2d
comment Can the verb 'judge' collocate with 'of'?
I'm sorry, @user85614, I might have misled you. My comment about old-fashioned was about the idiom "Judge of my delight": when I looked in google books, I couldn't find any recent examples. But as I said, the OED has an example of judge of from 1999, and that was in normal prose. But in general it's impossible to answer your question. It depends on the style, the context, and what your assessors want. I once wrote an essay for my masters and used a word that was normal in the technical background I came from, but my tutor didn't know the word and said "What does this mean?"
Jul
20
comment Passive voice expressed by means of the active voice
That car drives well is another counterexample.
Jul
20
comment Passive voice expressed by means of the active voice
No. This is only part of the answer, which is about language, not about the real world. It polishes up beautifully is an example of a parallel phrase where activity from outside is required to achieve the result.
Jul
20
comment Can the verb 'judge' collocate with 'of'?
Searching for it in Google gives a page of instances from Google books: it appears it is rather old fashioned. But it's what I immediately thought of.
Jul
20
comment What's the difference betwen perhaps and maybe?
You can make up a rule if it pleases you, and even use the words according to your rule. But unless you enrol other people to understand your rule, you are achieving nothing by doing so.
Jul
20
comment Passive voice expressed by means of the active voice
This is an example of what is sometimes called the middle voice. It is very common in English, particularly in the commercial world; but as you point out, it can't be used with all verbs.
Jul
20
comment Can the verb 'judge' collocate with 'of'?
I don't know why two people have downvoted: this seems quite unwarranted, particularly since the answer to the question is "yes" (see my answer), but several people are insisting on answering "no" or answering a different question.
Jul
20
answered Can the verb 'judge' collocate with 'of'?
Jul
20
comment Can the verb 'judge' collocate with 'of'?
Frank: that's the noun "judge", which is not what the question was about.
Jul
20
comment What function does this prepositional phrase have in this biblical sentence?
This does not make sense in modern English, and I am surprised to find that it apparently was grammatical at the the time of the KjV.
Jul
19
comment What is the correct verb to imply the move of a moveable bridge?
But neither phrase is common. Neither occurs even once in the COCA or BNC corpora.
Jul
19
comment What is the correct verb to imply the move of a moveable bridge?
It doesn't matter whether it is more or less accurate. Google ngrams shows that moving bridge has always been more prevalent than operating bridge, except for the period 1905-12 and the 1920's.