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 Yearling
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Apr
10
comment “You need [v.] no longer”
Yes, it's correct. A little old-fashioned, perhaps, but I prefer it.
Apr
10
comment Is there a word that means 'boring to death'?
Certainly - this form of medical misadventure would be termed "death by iatrogenic stultification."
Apr
6
comment collapse of the soviet union - connotation?
It depends on your perspective whether this was good or bad.
Apr
5
comment English equivalent of Argentine “persiana”
Possibly related to Persian blinds?
Mar
30
comment the water's edge
Interesting - I think "the edge of a cliff" must be from the land side rather than the air side, although it could be the top of the cliff or the bottom.
Mar
18
comment Usage of “homework,” “schoolwork,” and “assignment” in AmEng for schoolwork given to students to do at home
But when a parent asks a child "have you done your homework?" the intent is to find out if everything is done.
Mar
18
answered Usage of “homework,” “schoolwork,” and “assignment” in AmEng for schoolwork given to students to do at home
Mar
18
comment Usage of “homework,” “schoolwork,” and “assignment” in AmEng for schoolwork given to students to do at home
@Elian I don't think I have heard anyone say homework for housework.
Mar
16
comment Why does English have capital and small case letters?
It's a good question, but not really specific to English - Most European languages have upper and lower cases.
Mar
14
comment What is the English word that means “making something more broadly known and understood”?
I have updated my answer.
Mar
14
revised What is the English word that means “making something more broadly known and understood”?
added 148 characters in body
Mar
14
answered What is the English word that means “making something more broadly known and understood”?
Mar
5
comment Is “administrate” a valid English verb? What's the difference between it and “administer”?
If I were to do this again, I would add the info as a comment, or flesh it out to be a real answer.
Feb
25
awarded  Yearling
Feb
18
comment What special connotation does the word Inverness hold in Shakespeare's play Macbeth?
@Rob_Ster - he could handle every single word request by making something up...
Feb
12
comment Men sweat, but women glisten. What's the equivalent for a woman for snoring?
I was unsure of the order, but you have the correct quotation I was thinking of.
Feb
12
comment Men sweat, but women glisten. What's the equivalent for a woman for snoring?
Men perspire, women glow, and horses sweat.
Feb
9
comment I was set up in a sting
And then watch The Sting (movie).
Feb
8
comment Language school & language institute
I'd relax - there may be a real answer out there, but it sounds to me like this is just part of an English dialect in Iraq (and possibly other parts of Asia). Each culture English comes in contact with influences the type of English spoken there.
Feb
8
comment Language school & language institute
It's probably too strong to suggest they are using the wrong word; it is more likely that there is a subtle difference between the two types of establishment which can be expressed in Farsi but not in English.