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seen Sep 5 at 8:37

Feb
24
awarded  Yearling
Aug
24
awarded  Guru
Apr
18
comment Opposite of “verbose”
I'd argue that "concise" is using few words, while "terse" is using "too few" words, as it is often used when being annoyed and therefore reluctant to speak. The "too few" is also reflected in the slightly negative connotation of "terse", as opposed to "concise", which is neutral unless sarcasm is involved.
Apr
18
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
17
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
17
answered Opposite of “verbose”
Feb
24
awarded  Yearling
Nov
29
comment Is “my place” correct and common in British English?
@EdwinAshworth, for info the French would be chez moi (without the 's'). To be even more pretentious but risk not to be understood, can try à la maison, meaning "at my place".
Nov
27
revised Is “my place” correct and common in British English?
added 8 characters in body
Nov
27
accepted Is “my place” correct and common in British English?
Nov
27
comment Is “my place” correct and common in British English?
Thanks for the reply will-hunting, and @regdwigh, thanks for the laugh! I'll have a party at "my residence" to celebrate!
Nov
27
asked Is “my place” correct and common in British English?
May
5
accepted Substantive idiom for “a shoulder to cry on”
May
4
comment Substantive idiom for “a shoulder to cry on”
Point taken and you seem to be right. However, how best to express the fact that the confidence in question is about relationship and other hardship. A confident could be for anything positive or negative. Agony aunt seems best if used somehow metaphorically.
May
4
comment Substantive idiom for “a shoulder to cry on”
nice one, never heard of it
May
4
answered Substantive idiom for “a shoulder to cry on”
May
4
comment Substantive idiom for “a shoulder to cry on”
Confidant is good too, more general maybe
May
4
comment Substantive idiom for “a shoulder to cry on”
Ah, I got it, it's an "agony aunt"!
May
4
asked Substantive idiom for “a shoulder to cry on”