14,134 reputation
23283
bio website sourceforge.net/projects/…
location Dubai, United Arab Emirates
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen 2 hours ago

Born a Frenchman, addicted to the BBC (wherever I live bloom satellite dishes), I have spent several years in the UK (specifically Richmond (I said "UK" )) as well as in Italy (Naples (I said "Italy")). Currently based in Dubai (UAE).

An electronic Engineer by formation and an IT/Telecom professional by occupation, I've had the opportunity to work in many countries (Saudi Arabia, China mainland and Taiwan, Romania, Spain, Ghana, the Netherlands, Brazil, United States, Panama, Dominican Rep., Tunisia, Turkey, Sudan, Syria and a few others).

Raised by a German au pair at 5, having done my military duty in Germany, I've always been fascinated by languages in general and etymology in particular and my occupation has provided me with several opportunities to indulge in this hobby. I started to learn several languages and still can understand a few of them: including English, Italian and Spanish. The latter allowing me to communicate with my son (see avatar), my wife and my in-laws.

Other accounts I have in the stackexchange family include stackoverflow and programmers.

If you wish to contact me, please feel free to do so using my email/chat account which is alain dot pannetier at gmail dot com.


Sep
15
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
27
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Jun
10
awarded  Caucus
May
25
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
30
awarded  Custodian
Apr
30
reviewed Reopen Does the second (2nd) have anything to do with a second (1/60 minute)?
Apr
19
comment Is it “despite” or “despite of”?
Also note that the form in despite of is closer to its French origin en dépit de. Some of Shakespeare's citations you quote (especially the one from H. VI) are nice examples of this origin in which in despite of truly means "~regardless of/brushing off/despising other contrary opinions". They also bridge the semantic gap with other English cognates (such as despise or despicable) of their common Latin ancestor despicere (=> despectus => dépit => despite).
Apr
8
comment What do you call a man's skirt?
Incidentally, shirt and skirt have the same etymology: that of a unisex garment. Skirt [re-]entered the English vocabulary through Old Norse with many other "sk-" words (skin/shin, shatter/scatter, ship/skipper, score, sky...). The English shirt is a palatalised cognate of skirt. So you can always get away with it by stating that trousers were not en-vogue during the new kingdom era. At least in Egypt.
Apr
8
comment “Oriented” vs. “orientated”
@Robusto. Also, "In the Middle Ages many maps, including the T and O maps, were drawn with East at the top"
Apr
4
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
19
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
17
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
24
awarded  Yearling
Feb
16
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Using “on” before days or dates
Feb
16
reviewed Reject suggested edit on A stand-alone list of independent clauses as a sentence
Feb
16
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Does “code of conduct” mean the same as “code of ethics”?