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  • 181 votes cast
Dec
9
awarded  Scholar
Dec
9
awarded  Yearling
Dec
9
accepted “Take heed” vs “pay heed”
Dec
8
comment “Take heed” vs “pay heed”
Good point, by zooming on the graph, it seems like "pay heed" has stayed steady for the past several decades.
Dec
8
comment “Take heed” vs “pay heed”
I had checked Vocabulary.com but not Collins, thank you.
Dec
8
asked “Take heed” vs “pay heed”
Sep
28
comment “to make rapid” - like 'rapidify' or 'rapidise' [sic!]
Neither does streamline, though
Sep
27
awarded  Commentator
Sep
27
comment Another phrase for “To give the devil his due.”
These should be answers rather than comments.
Sep
25
comment “point of view” vs “approach”
In that case, I think "approach" is best. @shaunxer, I this "from... a perspective" is a good alternative to POV, depending on the formality of the writing. Considering this is about an algorithm, it's probably preferable to POV.
Sep
25
comment “point of view” vs “approach”
Does the algorithm use a different strategy if it is supervised? If so, then approach is good. Otherwise, I prefer "point of view".
Sep
25
answered “point of view” vs “approach”
Sep
24
comment What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
I agree, to me thrashing and convulsing connote non-rhythmic movement, which doesn't match the behavior of the bridge.
Sep
24
comment What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
I think undulate is the right word for this, especially if you have seen the video. For me, undulation best captures the slow, back and forth oscillation of the bridge.
Sep
24
answered Too much of belief in god and religion
Dec
13
awarded  Critic
Nov
19
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jan
4
comment Which is correct here: “arbitrary” or “arbitrarily”?
'Arbitrarily' is an adverb modifying an adjective, 'arbitrary' is an adjective.
Nov
8
comment Pronouncing the “N” as separate syllable at the end of words like “known” and “pattern”
I sometimes engage in this kind of hypercorrection for comic effect.
Nov
8
comment What do you call somebody who asks a question and somebody who answers a question?
Querent and Oracle have a similar bent.