2,034 reputation
715
bio website danrumney.com
location Chicago, IL
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen yesterday

Currently Technical Lead at Vodori (http://vodori.com) developing our application Pepper (Dojo/HTML 5/CSS 3/Spring/Java)

Was Software Engineer with IBM from 2002-2012, specialising in Storage (Disk and Tape).

Big nerd: http://podcast.nerdnite.com


Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@CarlWitthoft I'm afraid that's an outdated view; sex refers to biological difference that may be genotypical or phenotypical. Gender refers to the sociological construct that individuals ascribe to. This isn't a new thing - twospirit people have existed in First Nation and Native American tribes for generations.
Feb
23
awarded  Yearling
Dec
6
comment “If” vs “Only if” vs “If and only if”
"Only if" is the informal name for "Logical implication". Actualy, "if" is also a logical implication, with the propositions reversed
Nov
26
comment a line in Dracula
It's also worth noting that the character who says this, Van Helsing, is not a native speaker and is, in fact, Dutch.
Jul
16
comment Revealing that someone else is gay — counterpart to “come out”
Since, it stems from the concept of being in or out of the closet, right?
Jul
16
comment Revealing that someone else is gay — counterpart to “come out”
Does anyone have any references as to whether 'outing' originally referred to sexuality and then gained expanded usage? Or was it originally a general term and became closely tied to sexuality over time?
May
14
comment “Infer” vs. “imply” — can “infer” imply “imply”?
@ruakh merriam-webster.com/dictionary/literally. Strictly speaking, they list the definition as "virtually", but the following note indicates that they are trying to capture its hyperbolic use, ie figurative use.
May
13
comment “Infer” vs. “imply” — can “infer” imply “imply”?
Merriam-Webster recently updated the meaning of 'literally' to also mean 'figuratively'... so I guess they're comfortable with adopting misusage as usage.
Apr
5
awarded  Favorite Question
Feb
25
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
23
awarded  Yearling
Dec
18
accepted What is a good word to mean the inverse of debounce
Dec
13
asked What is a good word to mean the inverse of debounce
Aug
18
comment Should a contraction taken from the center of a word have two apostrophes?
Can we at least agree that "trep" is a horrifying and wholly unnecessary contraction and that the author of this article should have their fingers 'oppe' off?
Jul
23
awarded  Caucus
Apr
28
answered Plural and Singular Parallelism
Apr
28
answered Why Obama's “spiking the bin Laden football” was replaced with “highlighting with bin Ladin's death”? What's wrong with the former expression?
Feb
23
awarded  Yearling
Jan
17
comment What's the difference between “cardinal” and “ordinal” as adjectives?
@RegDwight: Thanks for the edit. That was embarrassing.
Dec
6
comment Neutral term for a person in the same organization
What is the nature of the organization? That might suggest some specific suggestions