232 reputation
39
bio website milky.manishsinha.net
location Tempe, AZ
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Aug 25 at 16:41

Open Minded, Rationalist. A FOSS Enthusiast but not a fanatic. Use .NET to earn my bread and butter

I am also one of the Zeitgeist Developers. If you ask a question, you can contact me via twitter and provide the link of your question.

Follow me on twitter http://twitter.com/m4n1sh


Aug
6
awarded  Good Question
Jun
5
comment Is there a word for capitalizing in the middle of a word, as in “eBay”?
@JoeZ. In programming world there isn't any one true method or organizations enforcing rules. BlackBerry is mostly called PascalCase and eBay called camelCase
Aug
24
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
9
awarded  Yearling
Mar
20
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
30
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
""I have a doubt in this concept" <-- I am not talking about the grammar but about using doubt as a term for confusion. I heard native-English speaks relate doubt with suspicion rather than "something being not clear"
Sep
29
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
I sometimes feel "pluck" is more appropriate than "pick". When someone says "pick the flowers" I think they are picking the flowers which are lying on the ground
Sep
29
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
@horatio This phrase is mostly used in "Corporate Environments". Just imagine getting a mail to any of you in America from someone in India with the body "Do the needful"
Sep
29
awarded  Scholar
Sep
29
accepted What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
Sep
29
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
29
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
I think the best "correct translation" would be "Please take of this". It is because "needful" implies that the person has to figure out himself what needs to be done.
Sep
29
revised What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
Added where all these words or phrases are used
Sep
28
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
@Mitch I understand your point. I was just pointing out that probably this is how language evolves. It might surely take lot of time, but at the end of the day it is how(evolving) many words went out of fashion in US or UK
Sep
28
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
I have an example where it is used in Corporate setting. The Project Manager gets a mail from the Marketing or Quality Team telling something is not done or missing. He will forward the mail to someone under him and write on top of the mail "Joe, please do the needful". Since it might be Joe's expertise domain, so he has to figure out what has to be done. I do agree that is sounds dictatorial. That's why it is not used in casually or in any other scenarios
Sep
28
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
I have seen the phrase "please do the needful" only in Corporate settings. Nowhere else. It is mostly used in mails to someone just subordinate to take necessary actions in response to a recent development.
Sep
28
comment What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?
Well, The term "prepone" is used in only one context "Prepone this event". I haven't heard anyone using it in any other way till date
Sep
28
awarded  Critic
Sep
28
comment Is there a more common phrase that means “preponed”?
Can we use the phrase "The meeting has been advanced". I heard a person using this instead of "prepone"
Sep
28
suggested suggested edit on What is wrong in “Please don't pluck the flowers” and other phrases used in the Indian subcontinent?