1,527 reputation
31433
bio website none
location Canada
age 37
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Jun 20 at 1:01

English language is a hobby.
Rule 1. The language has rules. These might be obscure or not, but the language is inherently governed by rules. A linguist might study a foreign language based on deeper knowledge than a non-linguist. It is up to someone to embrace deeper rules of language. Rule 2. People often assume (not entirely correctly) that being "native" is equivalent to being proficient or expert in a language. Rule 3. Context is very important in analyzing a text fragment


Sep
2
comment The article: communicative function
My intuition is that not only articles, but all other determiners have multiple functions; they are like gadgets that make language as flexible as possible on a limited space
Aug
11
comment If a letter isn't pronounced but affects pronunciation of other letters, is it still 'silent'?
@Janus Bahs Jacquet yes, John Lawler makes a good point, but from a pragmatic point of view how would those who want to improve pronunciation, as me and perhaps the OP, want to refer to this phenomenon? It has indeed a didactic usefulness. How would you else deal with it ?
Aug
4
comment “More clear” vs “Clearer”: when to use “more” instead of “-er”?
@Charles Thanks, I stand corrected
Jul
27
comment Difference between “question” and “query”
A good description can be found in Use the right word by S.Hayakawa He says that "it is the seriousness of intent on the part of the person who poses a question that makes the question a query". Also, a query can be complex, thus implying creativity to be solved. But your first paragraph is very good.
Jul
27
comment Difference between “question” and “query”
I like etymology but don't see how it explains the difference here
Jul
22
comment Difference between “question” and “query”
Do you have an example of a question which is not a query?
Sep
9
comment Pronunciation and usage of “bona fide”
@John Lawler well for the record, American Heritage Dictionary and Gage Canadian Dictionary (so not only American) do not use IPA. I do and would be happy if there were consensus.
Mar
8
comment Why is “women” pronounced the way it is?
wɪ-'mən in Canada (source: Gage Canadian Dictionary)
Mar
2
comment What is the term or phrase to describe some process is sequential independent?
@John Lawler But doesn't English intersect with math and other technical domains? Yes, the OP would get better answers there, but perhaps OP is too shy to post there. At his own risk...
Mar
1
comment -ing vs -in' ending
@Jon Purdy word-final phenomenon? One of the questions is quite general "So how should I pronounce "-ing"?". The OP is not sure how it should be pronounced.
Feb
29
comment -ing vs -in' ending
@Jon Purdy , no that is something different (g-dropping). What I wrote about is that [ŋg] becomes just [ŋ]. These two are different .
Feb
27
comment Universal Etymology of Words
there was even a question about why "mama" is so common in many languages:linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/865/…
Feb
27
comment Terminology of roles in a Q&A: The “asker” and “answerer”?
what-do-you-call-somebody-who-asks-a-question-and-somebody-who-answers-a-questio‌​: english.stackexchange.com/questions/12999/…
Feb
25
comment Either vs. among
related question: english.stackexchange.com/questions/40950/…
Feb
20
comment Why “go off”, as in “alarm went off”?
@FumbeFingers first, this bounty was to recompense Jon Purdy's answer. Secondly, in my mind, and perhaps hmemcpy's mind, "on" is associated with the start of a process (online, on air), rather than the end of a process (offline, off air).
Feb
18
comment Why “go off”, as in “alarm went off”?
Still, I think you are bound by usage. A logical explanation of why "off" was used rather than any other preposition would have satisfied me more.
Feb
14
comment “More clear” vs “Clearer”: when to use “more” instead of “-er”?
@ssakl what about funnier?
Feb
11
comment Difference between “underneath” and “under” when we describe an action
@jwpat7 I wish anastasia would delete her answer, which is wrong. She states "sit" is not stative, when in fact it is. My post below is an answer, not comment. In fact it is my chosen BA
Feb
11
comment Difference between “underneath” and “under” when we describe an action
@Matt you were right about the example. However, the dictionary lists under as a synonym of underneath, while there are examples when under cannot be substituted by underneath. So the dictionaries do not reflect always the usage.
Feb
9
comment X, Y, Z — horizontal, vertical and …?
I deleted my answer and downvoted. It seems to me this question has the narrow scope of naming a programming variable. The context/application of the axes is not given or explained. Neither it is said what kind of answer is expected.