Reputation
379
Top tag
Next privilege 500 Rep.
Access review queues
Badges
2 11
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~32k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 55 votes cast
Mar
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
1
revised Name for the bumper at the end of a parking spot - is it a “turtarrier”? If so, why?
Removed bit about me not knowing 'turtarrier'.
Nov
27
comment Is there a word or phrase for someone who strongly disapproves of smoking, drinking and gambling?
I wouldn't say 'means exactly what you're asking for' because gambling is generally not included in the list of things abstained from in straight edge culture. See sxeworldwide.tumblr.com/Edge-FAQ#sxe02 and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straight_edge
Oct
31
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
29
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Sep
29
comment Is there any “swearword” in English not associated with excrements, the genitals, sexual activity or religion?
Check out the Lexicon Valley podcast about profanity and obscenity with author Melissa Mohr. She talks about her book "Holy Shit: A Brief History of Swearing" which divides bad words into two major camps: the “holy”—religious oaths that we consider profane—and the “shit” —bodily functions and sexual terms that we deem obscene.
Aug
18
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
30
answered Name for the bumper at the end of a parking spot - is it a “turtarrier”? If so, why?
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
Jun
1
revised How did the Australian accent come about?
added 7 characters in body
Feb
28
awarded  Scholar
Feb
28
comment What is the plural of “How To”?
Thanks Jon. Great background info (here and in the link) and good tip with the formatting.
Feb
28
accepted What is the plural of “How To”?
Feb
28
awarded  Student
Feb
28
asked What is the plural of “How To”?
Feb
19
comment Legos not LEGO?
@nohat My point is that I disagree with the 'objects made by Foo are "Foos"' section of your answer when applied to 'Lego'. But you're the only one out of the two of us who has a degree in Linguistics so I can't argue with you on technical grounds ; ) Perhaps that section of your answer could benefit from a caveat that it applies only to the US where 'Lego' is used as a countable noun.
Feb
19
awarded  Editor
Feb
19
revised How did the Australian accent come about?
added 3 characters in body
Feb
18
comment Legos not LEGO?
In reference to 'toys made by Lego are "Legos"', I can't speak for others, but when I say 'Lego' I am referring to a particular object or set of objects, not a toy made by the company 'Lego'.
Feb
18
comment Legos not LEGO?
I agree that language users, not companies, have the final say, but none of the examples you gave (Rolex, Mac, Puma, Audi and GameBoy) are applicable because they are single items. Lego refers to a group of items (see, it's already plural) which are used together. Saying 'Legos' is pluralising a word that is already plural. You don't say 'How much woods do we need to build the shed?' or 'Do we have enough paints to cover the wall?' or 'How much sands will fit in the bucket'. Regarding one Lego, for me a single unit of Lego is a brick or piece.