138 reputation
9
bio website js-bits.blogspot.com
location San Diego, CA
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Mar 16 at 15:18

Client side/ middle tier web developer specializing in Ext-JS and connecting it to a backend while remaining server agnostic. Have programmed in C, C++, Java, ActionScript, Lingo, JavaScript, PHP.

My language of choice is JavaScript, I'm trying to use it on the server side with Node.js also.

Technologies I've worked with substantially:

  • HTML, CSS, DOM, AJAX, Ext-JS, jQuery, Google Closure Templates
  • ASP, PHP, JSP, Struts, Velocity, Node.js
  • Windows, Unix, OpenVMS, Solaris
  • Ant, make
  • XML-RPC, RESTful services

Patterns Used:

  • MVC, HMVC
  • Dependency Inversion
  • Flyweight
  • Javascript: Module Pattern, OO

Mar
15
comment What is the correct way to pluralize an acronym?
Single letters do seem to take apostrophes idioms.thefreedictionary.com/_/…
Mar
15
comment What is the correct way to pluralize an acronym?
@nohat idioms.thefreedictionary.com/_/…
Mar
15
comment Is it ever worth the time and effort to correct someone else's grating grammatical mistakes?
I think the point of your answer is that students of a language are open to constructive criticism
Mar
15
comment Is there a word for a change so small that it doesn’t seem to be a change at all?
It could be a really big change after all but still imperceptible
Mar
15
comment Is there a word for a change so small that it doesn’t seem to be a change at all?
If you insult homeopaths, are you a homeophobe?
Dec
19
awarded  Teacher
Dec
3
comment Term for someone who has experienced many hardships
Suffering hardships doesn't always make you street wise
Dec
3
comment What do you call a person who keeps on going despite setbacks? (in one word, a noun)
@Bentley4 I don't quite follow what the problem with tenacious is... what's the ambiguity?
Dec
3
comment What do you call a person who keeps on going despite setbacks? (in one word, a noun)
I think trooper is the closest, least ambiguous of the words.
Jul
25
comment Imperative + which, should
Take the survey to help the company choose which computer we should buy. Though people usually put should before the pronoun only in questions, some people do say "I don't know what should I buy", but "I don't know what I should buy" is more commonly used. Also "take a survey on" is not very common, "a survey about" sounds more natural
Feb
28
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
8
comment Origins: “try and” over “try to” — how did we get there from here?
@FumbleFingers "Did you try and succeed?" means "Did you try and did you succeed?" It doesn't mean "Did you try to succeed?"
Jun
8
comment “try” or “try out” (difference?)
I think try and try out are interchangeable when they mean sample. "Try out the new sushi place" gets 19,000,000 results on google and "Try the new sushi place" gets 13,000,000
Dec
14
comment Where does the phrase “dead simple” originate?
A very common usage of dead in the same sense: "He came in dead last"
Sep
14
answered “Don't got” — how common is it in American usage?
Sep
14
answered What is the correct usage for 'nominate'?
May
4
awarded  Scholar
May
4
awarded  Editor
May
4
revised How to write the date of an event that lasts a few days
added 4 characters in body
May
4
accepted How to write the date of an event that lasts a few days